The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Editorial - The NCRI Cancer Experiences Collaborative: defining self-management

Editorial - The NCRI Cancer Experiences Collaborative: defining self-management
Editorial - The NCRI Cancer Experiences Collaborative: defining self-management
Many people want an active role in managing problems associated with cancer and other potentially life limiting conditions as part of their daily lives. UK policy aims to enhance the practice of patient centred care, patient choice and patient involvement in care decisions and service development (Department of Health, 2006; Department of Health, 2005 Department of Health, National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions, Department of Health, London (2005).Department of Health, 2005; National Institute for Clinical Excellence, 2004) including people at the end of life (UK End of Life Care Strategy is in development). Policy initiatives also promote patients as experts in their own care and management (Department of Health, 2001) but there is little evidence regarding how best to support this, particularly in supportive and palliative care. A systematic literature review explored the empirical evidence of what people do to help themselves following a cancer diagnosis (Foster et al., 2005) and concluded that self-management is poorly defined and lacks a theoretical framework. Few studies specifically explore what patients do to help themselves, what enables them to do so, and how this can be supported. There is also insufficient evidence to determine whether helping people to help themselves live with cancer actually enhances their physical and psychological well being. Limited knowledge and approaches for helping patients to help themselves, commonly called ‘self-management’, indicates that attention should be directed at supporting individuals to manage problems associated with their illness themselves, even while dying. However, to achieve this, there is a need to enhance good quality research in supportive, palliative and end of life care and also increase the number of skilled researchers in this field.
cancer experiences, defining self management
1462-3889
295-297
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Brown, Janice
0d307639-0d40-44f0-a310-6925bf36c38e
Killen, Maureen
47aee157-1262-48ff-8422-8517ed43bae3
Brearley, Sarah
dde8f619-5958-4801-9a0f-08039f39d934
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Brown, Janice
0d307639-0d40-44f0-a310-6925bf36c38e
Killen, Maureen
47aee157-1262-48ff-8422-8517ed43bae3
Brearley, Sarah
dde8f619-5958-4801-9a0f-08039f39d934

Foster, Claire, Brown, Janice, Killen, Maureen and Brearley, Sarah (2007) Editorial - The NCRI Cancer Experiences Collaborative: defining self-management. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 11 (4), 295-297. (doi:10.1016/j.ejon.2007.08.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many people want an active role in managing problems associated with cancer and other potentially life limiting conditions as part of their daily lives. UK policy aims to enhance the practice of patient centred care, patient choice and patient involvement in care decisions and service development (Department of Health, 2006; Department of Health, 2005 Department of Health, National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions, Department of Health, London (2005).Department of Health, 2005; National Institute for Clinical Excellence, 2004) including people at the end of life (UK End of Life Care Strategy is in development). Policy initiatives also promote patients as experts in their own care and management (Department of Health, 2001) but there is little evidence regarding how best to support this, particularly in supportive and palliative care. A systematic literature review explored the empirical evidence of what people do to help themselves following a cancer diagnosis (Foster et al., 2005) and concluded that self-management is poorly defined and lacks a theoretical framework. Few studies specifically explore what patients do to help themselves, what enables them to do so, and how this can be supported. There is also insufficient evidence to determine whether helping people to help themselves live with cancer actually enhances their physical and psychological well being. Limited knowledge and approaches for helping patients to help themselves, commonly called ‘self-management’, indicates that attention should be directed at supporting individuals to manage problems associated with their illness themselves, even while dying. However, to achieve this, there is a need to enhance good quality research in supportive, palliative and end of life care and also increase the number of skilled researchers in this field.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2007
Keywords: cancer experiences, defining self management
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 58064
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/58064
ISSN: 1462-3889
PURE UUID: a32aaa55-ab99-4be4-9988-06278bceeaf4
ORCID for Claire Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2008
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:47

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×