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Breakwater morphological modelling: predicting equilibrium morphologies using entropy based techniques

Breakwater morphological modelling: predicting equilibrium morphologies using entropy based techniques
Breakwater morphological modelling: predicting equilibrium morphologies using entropy based techniques
In order to design suitable breakwaters for beach protection, morphological modelling is required. This modelling can be utilised to determine the effectiveness of different structures and the position that sand is likely to move to when a stable, equilibrium morphology develops. The majority of morphological models currently used are time-step based. They involve the interaction of wave, current, sediment transport and sediment balance modules. Sediment is transported over a small amount of time, after which the modules are updated and sediment transport calculations begin again. In this paper a new method is put forward, where the need to time step is avoided. Different morphologies are compared directly, based on an objective function, where morphologies closer to the desired equilibrium have a smaller net sediment transport. Morphologies are modified using global optimisation techniques. This new method is able to predict sediment deposition in the lee of detached shore parallel breakwaters.
Nield, Joanna M.
173be2c5-b953-481a-abc4-c095e5e4b790
Walker, David J.
545cf0b8-54a0-4a43-8d39-ff42e1209c4e
Lambert, Martin F.
9dc677bb-34f3-446a-a7f0-0daa444a43ac
Nield, Joanna M.
173be2c5-b953-481a-abc4-c095e5e4b790
Walker, David J.
545cf0b8-54a0-4a43-8d39-ff42e1209c4e
Lambert, Martin F.
9dc677bb-34f3-446a-a7f0-0daa444a43ac

Nield, Joanna M., Walker, David J. and Lambert, Martin F. (2005) Breakwater morphological modelling: predicting equilibrium morphologies using entropy based techniques. 5th International Conference on Coastal Dynamics 2005 - State of the Practice. 04 - 08 Apr 2005. 13 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In order to design suitable breakwaters for beach protection, morphological modelling is required. This modelling can be utilised to determine the effectiveness of different structures and the position that sand is likely to move to when a stable, equilibrium morphology develops. The majority of morphological models currently used are time-step based. They involve the interaction of wave, current, sediment transport and sediment balance modules. Sediment is transported over a small amount of time, after which the modules are updated and sediment transport calculations begin again. In this paper a new method is put forward, where the need to time step is avoided. Different morphologies are compared directly, based on an objective function, where morphologies closer to the desired equilibrium have a smaller net sediment transport. Morphologies are modified using global optimisation techniques. This new method is able to predict sediment deposition in the lee of detached shore parallel breakwaters.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Venue - Dates: 5th International Conference on Coastal Dynamics 2005 - State of the Practice, 2005-04-04 - 2005-04-08

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 58073
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/58073
PURE UUID: 4d146a5c-8672-460d-bf11-d2d27730e5b2
ORCID for Joanna M. Nield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2657-0525

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Aug 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:39

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Contributors

Author: Joanna M. Nield ORCID iD
Author: David J. Walker
Author: Martin F. Lambert

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