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Lattice-automaton bioturbation simulator (LABS): implementation for small deposit feeders

Lattice-automaton bioturbation simulator (LABS): implementation for small deposit feeders
Lattice-automaton bioturbation simulator (LABS): implementation for small deposit feeders
A new model for biological activity and its effects in sediments is presented. Sediment is represented as a random 2D collection of solid and water “particles”, distributed on a regular lattice with individually assigned chemical, biological and physical properties, e.g. food versus inert material. Model benthic organisms move through the lattice (the virtual sediment) as programmable entities, i.e., automatons, by displacing or ingesting–defecating particles. Each type of automaton obeys a different set of rules, both deterministic and stochastic, designed to mimic real infauna. In the present version of the model code, the organisms are simple small deposit feeders, resembling capitellids.

The results from the model are 2D visualizations of the movement of the animals and the particles with time. The latter provide immediate appreciation of the consequences of animal actions on sediment fabric and composition, including both the mixing, traditionally associated with bioturbation, and the development of biologically-induced heterogeneities, which are observed in real sediments. The output is readily amenable to presentation as computer-generated (QuickTimeTM) movies, for which links are provided to such examples. As a particular case, we present a simulation of the mixing of a sand plug in a muddy sediment which shows that this is process not accomplished by counter-diffusion of sand and mud but by displacement and dilution of the sand with mud that is defecated as feces therein; this mode of mixing appears to be far more favorable to preservation of this sand feature than traditional diffusive models.

Bioturbation, Automatons, Mixing, Particle-lattice, Deposit feeders
0098-3004
213-222
Choi, J.
9e1c1c71-69d4-4141-b0ca-66acf663b3a9
Francois-Carcaillet, F.
9e0c9cf2-f1d2-4f35-b463-51bcddb3d528
Boudreau, B.P.
b32c0db6-4c4e-4a6d-be0d-990bfe4b43c5
Choi, J.
9e1c1c71-69d4-4141-b0ca-66acf663b3a9
Francois-Carcaillet, F.
9e0c9cf2-f1d2-4f35-b463-51bcddb3d528
Boudreau, B.P.
b32c0db6-4c4e-4a6d-be0d-990bfe4b43c5

Choi, J., Francois-Carcaillet, F. and Boudreau, B.P. (2002) Lattice-automaton bioturbation simulator (LABS): implementation for small deposit feeders. Computers & Geosciences, 28 (2), 213-222. (doi:10.1016/S0098-3004(01)00064-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A new model for biological activity and its effects in sediments is presented. Sediment is represented as a random 2D collection of solid and water “particles”, distributed on a regular lattice with individually assigned chemical, biological and physical properties, e.g. food versus inert material. Model benthic organisms move through the lattice (the virtual sediment) as programmable entities, i.e., automatons, by displacing or ingesting–defecating particles. Each type of automaton obeys a different set of rules, both deterministic and stochastic, designed to mimic real infauna. In the present version of the model code, the organisms are simple small deposit feeders, resembling capitellids.

The results from the model are 2D visualizations of the movement of the animals and the particles with time. The latter provide immediate appreciation of the consequences of animal actions on sediment fabric and composition, including both the mixing, traditionally associated with bioturbation, and the development of biologically-induced heterogeneities, which are observed in real sediments. The output is readily amenable to presentation as computer-generated (QuickTimeTM) movies, for which links are provided to such examples. As a particular case, we present a simulation of the mixing of a sand plug in a muddy sediment which shows that this is process not accomplished by counter-diffusion of sand and mud but by displacement and dilution of the sand with mud that is defecated as feces therein; this mode of mixing appears to be far more favorable to preservation of this sand feature than traditional diffusive models.

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More information

Published date: March 2002
Keywords: Bioturbation, Automatons, Mixing, Particle-lattice, Deposit feeders

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 58263
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/58263
ISSN: 0098-3004
PURE UUID: b8320efc-75c3-437c-aedb-c19044db49db

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:32

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