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Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: effects of posture

Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: effects of posture
Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: effects of posture
Lumped parameter mathematical models representing anatomical parts of the human body have been developed to represent body motions associated with resonances of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body standing in five different postures: ‘upright’, ‘lordotic’, ‘anterior lean’, ‘knees bent’, and ‘knees more bent’. The inertial and geometric parameters of the models were determined from published anthropometric data. Stiffness and damping parameters were obtained by comparing model responses with experimental data obtained previously.
The principal resonance of the vertical apparent mass, and the first peak in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass, of the standing body in an upright posture (at 5–6 Hz) corresponded to vertical motion of the viscera in phase with the vertical motion of the entire body due to deformation of the tissues at the soles of the feet, with pitch motion of the pelvis out of phase with pitch motion of the upper body above the pelvis. Upward motion of the body was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the pelvis. Changing the posture of the upper body had minor effects on the mode associated with the principal resonances of the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass, but the mode changed significantly with bending of the legs. In legs-bent postures, the principal resonance (at about 3 Hz) was attributed to bending of the legs coupled with pitch motion of the pelvis in phase with pitch motion of the upper body. In this mode, extension of the legs was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the upper body and the upward vertical motion of the viscera.
0022-460X
400-418
Subashi, G.H.M.J.
78f53bea-503e-48c4-87ba-465f69d10e9d
Matsumoto, Y.
326c6cca-baec-4a2f-996d-6909570397de
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Subashi, G.H.M.J.
78f53bea-503e-48c4-87ba-465f69d10e9d
Matsumoto, Y.
326c6cca-baec-4a2f-996d-6909570397de
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Subashi, G.H.M.J., Matsumoto, Y. and Griffin, M.J. (2008) Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: effects of posture. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 317 (2), 400-418. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2008.03.019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Lumped parameter mathematical models representing anatomical parts of the human body have been developed to represent body motions associated with resonances of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body standing in five different postures: ‘upright’, ‘lordotic’, ‘anterior lean’, ‘knees bent’, and ‘knees more bent’. The inertial and geometric parameters of the models were determined from published anthropometric data. Stiffness and damping parameters were obtained by comparing model responses with experimental data obtained previously.
The principal resonance of the vertical apparent mass, and the first peak in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass, of the standing body in an upright posture (at 5–6 Hz) corresponded to vertical motion of the viscera in phase with the vertical motion of the entire body due to deformation of the tissues at the soles of the feet, with pitch motion of the pelvis out of phase with pitch motion of the upper body above the pelvis. Upward motion of the body was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the pelvis. Changing the posture of the upper body had minor effects on the mode associated with the principal resonances of the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass, but the mode changed significantly with bending of the legs. In legs-bent postures, the principal resonance (at about 3 Hz) was attributed to bending of the legs coupled with pitch motion of the pelvis in phase with pitch motion of the upper body. In this mode, extension of the legs was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the upper body and the upward vertical motion of the viscera.

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More information

Published date: 21 October 2008
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 58639
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/58639
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: b23af92d-7208-434d-8346-759a7e1aa6be
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Aug 2008
Last modified: 29 Aug 2019 00:55

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