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Managing incontinence using technology, devices and products: directions for research

Managing incontinence using technology, devices and products: directions for research
Managing incontinence using technology, devices and products: directions for research
Background: Millions of Americans with incontinence use some type of device or product to manage or collect urine or feces. However, research on their clinical uses, problems requiring nursing care, and patient satisfaction is lacking.
Objectives: To review the various products and devices used for incontinence, identify directions for research and development on technology, and outline the ways nurses can influence and participate in those investigations.
Methods: Existing literature on incontinence technology, devices, and products was analyzed to generate a plan for future research.
Results: Gaps in knowledge exist about the uses, best practices, quality of life factors, and problems associated with catheters, absorbent products, other internal and external devices, and skin care products.
Conclusions: Collaboration among public and private sectors would result in greater likelihood of high quality clinical research that has sufficient power and integrity, more efficient use of resources special to each setting, and expedited application of technologies for patient use.
incontinence using technology, directions for research
0029-6562
S42-S48
Newman, Diane K.
3677723a-fe98-4b1d-a2cf-df64dd5d37de
Fader, Mandy
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277
Bliss, Donna Z.
4d3538cd-d667-4aff-8d81-23deb3beac5a
Newman, Diane K.
3677723a-fe98-4b1d-a2cf-df64dd5d37de
Fader, Mandy
c318f942-2ddb-462a-9183-8b678faf7277
Bliss, Donna Z.
4d3538cd-d667-4aff-8d81-23deb3beac5a

Newman, Diane K., Fader, Mandy and Bliss, Donna Z. (2004) Managing incontinence using technology, devices and products: directions for research. Nursing Research, 53 (6-Supp), S42-S48.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Millions of Americans with incontinence use some type of device or product to manage or collect urine or feces. However, research on their clinical uses, problems requiring nursing care, and patient satisfaction is lacking.
Objectives: To review the various products and devices used for incontinence, identify directions for research and development on technology, and outline the ways nurses can influence and participate in those investigations.
Methods: Existing literature on incontinence technology, devices, and products was analyzed to generate a plan for future research.
Results: Gaps in knowledge exist about the uses, best practices, quality of life factors, and problems associated with catheters, absorbent products, other internal and external devices, and skin care products.
Conclusions: Collaboration among public and private sectors would result in greater likelihood of high quality clinical research that has sufficient power and integrity, more efficient use of resources special to each setting, and expedited application of technologies for patient use.

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More information

Published date: November 2004
Keywords: incontinence using technology, directions for research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 58955
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/58955
ISSN: 0029-6562
PURE UUID: 0899ca15-fe11-4ff8-b0ce-27299100eddf

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Aug 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:31

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