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Late Quaternary turbidite input into the east Mediterranean Basin: new radiocarbon constraints on climate and sea-level control

Late Quaternary turbidite input into the east Mediterranean Basin: new radiocarbon constraints on climate and sea-level control
Late Quaternary turbidite input into the east Mediterranean Basin: new radiocarbon constraints on climate and sea-level control
The Late Pleistocene-Holocene (0–30 ka bp) allochthonous sedimentation in the Herodotus Basin of the eastern Mediterranean has been controlled, in part, by a combination of regional climatic change and eustatic sea-level fluctuation. A new series of radiocarbon dates, made on planktonic foraminifers and pteropod shells taken from the pelagic and hemipelagic intervals between individual turbidite units, has given bracketing dates for each major turbidity current event that deposited sand and mud on the Herodotus Basin plain. Two partly independent cycles are evident. Climate-induced cycles have lead to an alternation of periods of turbidites sourced from the Nile delta-fan system with those from the North African shelf and Anatolian rise. These correlate with pluvial and inter-pluvial climatic periods recognized in the Nile hinterland. Sea-level cycles have tended to focus turbidite emplacement, from whatever source, at periods of sea-level fall within the latest Wisconsin and sea-level rise from the Wisconsin-Holocene period. In addition to the Herodotus Basin Megaturbidite (HBM) described previously, six other beds with volumes in excess of 25 km3 and wide lateral extent across the basin can be termed megaturbidites. There is no simple sea-level or climate control on the timing of these events, so we must conclude that triggering and emplacement of megaturbidites is independent and variable.

191
267-278
Geological Society of London
Reeder, M.S.
0c391f66-bfab-4728-8412-403bcbfc5f07
Stow, D.A.V.
434350cd-0ae5-4bb3-b71f-e1da90587f74
Rothwell, R.G.
fe473057-bf44-46d1-8add-88060037beb5
Jones, S.J.
Frostick, L.E.
Reeder, M.S.
0c391f66-bfab-4728-8412-403bcbfc5f07
Stow, D.A.V.
434350cd-0ae5-4bb3-b71f-e1da90587f74
Rothwell, R.G.
fe473057-bf44-46d1-8add-88060037beb5
Jones, S.J.
Frostick, L.E.

Reeder, M.S., Stow, D.A.V. and Rothwell, R.G. (2002) Late Quaternary turbidite input into the east Mediterranean Basin: new radiocarbon constraints on climate and sea-level control. In, Jones, S.J. and Frostick, L.E. (eds.) Sediment flux to basins: causes, controls and consequences. (Geological Society Special Publication, 191) London, GB. Geological Society of London, pp. 267-278. (doi:10.1144/GSL.SP.2002.191.01.18).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The Late Pleistocene-Holocene (0–30 ka bp) allochthonous sedimentation in the Herodotus Basin of the eastern Mediterranean has been controlled, in part, by a combination of regional climatic change and eustatic sea-level fluctuation. A new series of radiocarbon dates, made on planktonic foraminifers and pteropod shells taken from the pelagic and hemipelagic intervals between individual turbidite units, has given bracketing dates for each major turbidity current event that deposited sand and mud on the Herodotus Basin plain. Two partly independent cycles are evident. Climate-induced cycles have lead to an alternation of periods of turbidites sourced from the Nile delta-fan system with those from the North African shelf and Anatolian rise. These correlate with pluvial and inter-pluvial climatic periods recognized in the Nile hinterland. Sea-level cycles have tended to focus turbidite emplacement, from whatever source, at periods of sea-level fall within the latest Wisconsin and sea-level rise from the Wisconsin-Holocene period. In addition to the Herodotus Basin Megaturbidite (HBM) described previously, six other beds with volumes in excess of 25 km3 and wide lateral extent across the basin can be termed megaturbidites. There is no simple sea-level or climate control on the timing of these events, so we must conclude that triggering and emplacement of megaturbidites is independent and variable.

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More information

Published date: 2002
Additional Information: Actually deposited by Jane Conquer

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 59198
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/59198
PURE UUID: 6a57a8f4-b4cf-45d9-8465-43f99218a281

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Date deposited: 27 Aug 2008
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 10:01

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Contributors

Author: M.S. Reeder
Author: D.A.V. Stow
Author: R.G. Rothwell
Editor: S.J. Jones
Editor: L.E. Frostick

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