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Trends in human birth weight across two successive generations

Trends in human birth weight across two successive generations
Trends in human birth weight across two successive generations
OBJECTIVE: To determine the correlation between parental and offspring birthweight (BW) in India.
METHODS: The study involved two birth cohorts of successive generations. The parental cohort comprised of 472 fathers and 422 mothers from an earlier study. Details of their anthropometry at birth and in adulthood were available. 1525 children born to them comprised the offspring cohort. BW was obtained from hospital records for the offspring cohort. Odds ratios and regression coefficients were calculated to estimate the risks of a low birth weight (LBW) parent producing a LBW baby and quantitate the effects after adjusting for confounders.
RESULTS: A LBW mother had a 2.8 times risk (95%CI 1.2-6.4) of delivering a LBW baby (p=0.02) and a LBW father was twice as likely to produce a LBW baby (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.0 - 4.8; p=0.05). Every 100g increase in maternal BW was associated with an increase in offspring BW of 14 g; the equivalent figure for paternal BW was 18.1g (p< 0.001 for both). Between the generations, the incidence of LBW decreased from 19.7% to 17.2% (p=0.1). Mean BW increased in males (2846 g vs 2861 g; p=0.59) but not in females (2790 g vs 2743 g; p=0.08).
CONCLUSION: Both maternal and paternal BW are strong determinants of offspring BW. The effect of mothers' BW on offspring BW is weaker than that seen in developed nations. Stronger intrauterine constraint exhibited by Indian women secondary to a higher prevalence of growth restriction in utero may be responsible. Paternal effects may be governed by paternal genes inherited by the offspring.
human, birth weight, india, research, fathers, birth-weight, odds ratio, female, trends, risk, infant, incidence, women, risk factors, mothers, in-utero, maternal, developing countries, regression analysis, genetics, cohort studies, pregnancy, methods, growth, epidemiology, time, low birth weight, anthropometry, humans, fetal growth retardation, prevalence, weight, male, medical records, gene, cohort, newborn, statistics & numerical data, birth
0019-5456
111-117
Agnihotri, B.
95005cf9-5a75-41da-b065-77a7d608acc2
Antonisamy, B.
87df9c21-df68-4938-91d4-67245dab1211
Priya, G.
b5cd6adb-c6a0-4345-b8a4-fc7d5b1c6fe9
Fall, C.H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Raghupathy, P.
ba05ab93-08da-4e0a-b6a2-bbb4b65e4e51
Agnihotri, B.
95005cf9-5a75-41da-b065-77a7d608acc2
Antonisamy, B.
87df9c21-df68-4938-91d4-67245dab1211
Priya, G.
b5cd6adb-c6a0-4345-b8a4-fc7d5b1c6fe9
Fall, C.H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Raghupathy, P.
ba05ab93-08da-4e0a-b6a2-bbb4b65e4e51

Agnihotri, B., Antonisamy, B., Priya, G., Fall, C.H.D. and Raghupathy, P. (2008) Trends in human birth weight across two successive generations. The Indian Journal of Pediatrics, 75 (2), 111-117. (doi:10.1007/s12098-008-0066-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the correlation between parental and offspring birthweight (BW) in India.
METHODS: The study involved two birth cohorts of successive generations. The parental cohort comprised of 472 fathers and 422 mothers from an earlier study. Details of their anthropometry at birth and in adulthood were available. 1525 children born to them comprised the offspring cohort. BW was obtained from hospital records for the offspring cohort. Odds ratios and regression coefficients were calculated to estimate the risks of a low birth weight (LBW) parent producing a LBW baby and quantitate the effects after adjusting for confounders.
RESULTS: A LBW mother had a 2.8 times risk (95%CI 1.2-6.4) of delivering a LBW baby (p=0.02) and a LBW father was twice as likely to produce a LBW baby (OR 2.2; 95%CI 1.0 - 4.8; p=0.05). Every 100g increase in maternal BW was associated with an increase in offspring BW of 14 g; the equivalent figure for paternal BW was 18.1g (p< 0.001 for both). Between the generations, the incidence of LBW decreased from 19.7% to 17.2% (p=0.1). Mean BW increased in males (2846 g vs 2861 g; p=0.59) but not in females (2790 g vs 2743 g; p=0.08).
CONCLUSION: Both maternal and paternal BW are strong determinants of offspring BW. The effect of mothers' BW on offspring BW is weaker than that seen in developed nations. Stronger intrauterine constraint exhibited by Indian women secondary to a higher prevalence of growth restriction in utero may be responsible. Paternal effects may be governed by paternal genes inherited by the offspring.

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More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: human, birth weight, india, research, fathers, birth-weight, odds ratio, female, trends, risk, infant, incidence, women, risk factors, mothers, in-utero, maternal, developing countries, regression analysis, genetics, cohort studies, pregnancy, methods, growth, epidemiology, time, low birth weight, anthropometry, humans, fetal growth retardation, prevalence, weight, male, medical records, gene, cohort, newborn, statistics & numerical data, birth
Organisations: Dev Origins of Health & Disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60857
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60857
ISSN: 0019-5456
PURE UUID: 558fd685-8596-43c4-a64b-de6df844cc16

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Date deposited: 11 Sep 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:29

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Contributors

Author: B. Agnihotri
Author: B. Antonisamy
Author: G. Priya
Author: C.H.D. Fall
Author: P. Raghupathy

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