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Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?

Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?
Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?
The UK Food Standards Agency convened an international group of expert scientists to review the Agency-funded projects on diet and bone health in the context of developments in the field as a whole. The potential benefits of fruit and vegetables, vitamin K, early-life nutrition and vitamin D on bone health were presented and reviewed. The workshop reached two conclusions which have public health implications. First, that promoting a diet rich in fruit and vegetable intakes might be beneficial to bone health and would be very unlikely to produce adverse consequences on bone health. The mechanism(s) for any effect of fruit and vegetables remains unknown, but the results from these projects did not support the postulated acid-base balance hypothesis. Secondly, increased dietary consumption of vitamin K may contribute to bone health, possibly through its ability to increase the gamma-carboxylation status of bone proteins such as osteocalcin. A supplementation trial comparing vitamin K supplementation with Ca and vitamin D showed an additional effect of vitamin K against baseline levels of bone mineral density, but the benefit was only seen at one bone site. The major research gap identified was the need to investigate vitamin D status to define deficiency, insufficiency and depletion across age and ethnic groups in relation to bone health
health, ethnic groups, development, consequences, bone, diet, early-life, osteocalcin, nutrition, vitamin d, review, hypothesis, proteins, research, health policy, protein, europe, hertfordshire, public health, deficiency, standards
0007-1145
198-205
Ashwell, M.
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Stone, E.
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Mathers, J.
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Barnes, S.
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Compston, J.
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Francis, R.M.
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Key, T.
4bfcb257-b1c7-4387-95fe-a0946cf75ba2
Cashman, K.D.
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Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Tee Khaw, K.
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Lanham-New, S.
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Macdonald, H.
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Prentice, A.
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Shearer, M.
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Stephen, A.
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Ashwell, M.
5414d585-2af6-490c-b7bf-b44064cf50e5
Stone, E.
e3978c14-62a5-4ecb-969e-52df3fbdf609
Mathers, J.
690c2764-65b7-4792-b560-4b5dd7f7f279
Barnes, S.
2fd4f193-3edb-41ba-9edd-41cad52383fd
Compston, J.
b64c0d0e-97dd-44c8-97ba-f756f0bc966d
Francis, R.M.
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Key, T.
4bfcb257-b1c7-4387-95fe-a0946cf75ba2
Cashman, K.D.
7032add1-54ea-4713-a4fb-5d3264dd74c8
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Tee Khaw, K.
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Lanham-New, S.
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Macdonald, H.
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Prentice, A.
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Shearer, M.
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Stephen, A.
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Ashwell, M., Stone, E., Mathers, J., Barnes, S., Compston, J., Francis, R.M., Key, T., Cashman, K.D., Cooper, C., Tee Khaw, K., Lanham-New, S., Macdonald, H., Prentice, A., Shearer, M. and Stephen, A. (2008) Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy? British Journal of Nutrition, 99 (1), 198-205. (doi:10.1017/S0007114507771891).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The UK Food Standards Agency convened an international group of expert scientists to review the Agency-funded projects on diet and bone health in the context of developments in the field as a whole. The potential benefits of fruit and vegetables, vitamin K, early-life nutrition and vitamin D on bone health were presented and reviewed. The workshop reached two conclusions which have public health implications. First, that promoting a diet rich in fruit and vegetable intakes might be beneficial to bone health and would be very unlikely to produce adverse consequences on bone health. The mechanism(s) for any effect of fruit and vegetables remains unknown, but the results from these projects did not support the postulated acid-base balance hypothesis. Secondly, increased dietary consumption of vitamin K may contribute to bone health, possibly through its ability to increase the gamma-carboxylation status of bone proteins such as osteocalcin. A supplementation trial comparing vitamin K supplementation with Ca and vitamin D showed an additional effect of vitamin K against baseline levels of bone mineral density, but the benefit was only seen at one bone site. The major research gap identified was the need to investigate vitamin D status to define deficiency, insufficiency and depletion across age and ethnic groups in relation to bone health

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Published date: 2008
Keywords: health, ethnic groups, development, consequences, bone, diet, early-life, osteocalcin, nutrition, vitamin d, review, hypothesis, proteins, research, health policy, protein, europe, hertfordshire, public health, deficiency, standards

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60874
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60874
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 720beae8-f9ca-453e-a8c3-be334a5f87d7
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Sep 2008
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:56

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Contributors

Author: M. Ashwell
Author: E. Stone
Author: J. Mathers
Author: S. Barnes
Author: J. Compston
Author: R.M. Francis
Author: T. Key
Author: K.D. Cashman
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: K. Tee Khaw
Author: S. Lanham-New
Author: H. Macdonald
Author: A. Prentice
Author: M. Shearer
Author: A. Stephen

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