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Polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in young men and women consuming their habitual diets

Polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in young men and women consuming their habitual diets
Polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in young men and women consuming their habitual diets
Young women of reproductive age appear to have a greater capacity than men to convert the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid to DHA. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that gender-related differences in n-3 PUFA metabolism are reflected in the concentrations of n-3 PUFA in plasma lipids. The subjects were healthy men (n 13) and women (n 23) aged 18-35 years consuming their habitual diet. Dietary habits were assessed by food-frequency questionnaire. Venous blood samples were collected following an overnight fast. For the women, blood collection took place on the tenth day of their menstrual cycle. The fatty acid concentrations of plasma phosphatidylcholine, triacylglycerol, NEFA and cholesteryl esters were determined by gas chromatography. There were no significant differences between men and women in their consumption of protein, carbohydrate, total fat, alcohol, individual fatty acids and selected micronutrients. DHA concentration alone was significantly higher in plasma phosphatidylcholine (31 %, P = 0.02), triacylglycerol (71 %, P = 0.02) and NEFA (33 %, P = 0.01), but not cholesteryl esters, in women compared with men. There were no significant differences between men and women in the concentrations of any other fatty acids measured. Overall, the present data support the suggestion that greater DHA synthesis in women than men results in a higher DHA concentration in plasma lipids
adult, dietary proteins, cholesterol, proteins, nutrition, triglycerides, alcohol, pufa, dietary carbohydrates, plasma, physiology, acid, menstrual cycle, unsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acid, diet, micronutrients, lipids, metabolism, sex factors, fatty acids, women, young men, origins, docosahexaenoic acids, protein, fatty acid, phosphatidylcholines, male, human, aged, humans, blood, cholesterol esters, carbohydrate, nonesterified, food habits, health, disease, developmental origins, men, hypothesis, female, administration & dosage, alpha-linolenic acid
0007-1145
93-99
Bakewell, L.
79081b02-68a0-4687-aa77-0ed8504fa0e2
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Bakewell, L.
79081b02-68a0-4687-aa77-0ed8504fa0e2
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Bakewell, L., Burdge, G.C. and Calder, P.C. (2006) Polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in young men and women consuming their habitual diets. British Journal of Nutrition, 96 (1), 93-99. (doi:10.1079/BJN20061801).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Young women of reproductive age appear to have a greater capacity than men to convert the essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid to DHA. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that gender-related differences in n-3 PUFA metabolism are reflected in the concentrations of n-3 PUFA in plasma lipids. The subjects were healthy men (n 13) and women (n 23) aged 18-35 years consuming their habitual diet. Dietary habits were assessed by food-frequency questionnaire. Venous blood samples were collected following an overnight fast. For the women, blood collection took place on the tenth day of their menstrual cycle. The fatty acid concentrations of plasma phosphatidylcholine, triacylglycerol, NEFA and cholesteryl esters were determined by gas chromatography. There were no significant differences between men and women in their consumption of protein, carbohydrate, total fat, alcohol, individual fatty acids and selected micronutrients. DHA concentration alone was significantly higher in plasma phosphatidylcholine (31 %, P = 0.02), triacylglycerol (71 %, P = 0.02) and NEFA (33 %, P = 0.01), but not cholesteryl esters, in women compared with men. There were no significant differences between men and women in the concentrations of any other fatty acids measured. Overall, the present data support the suggestion that greater DHA synthesis in women than men results in a higher DHA concentration in plasma lipids

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: adult, dietary proteins, cholesterol, proteins, nutrition, triglycerides, alcohol, pufa, dietary carbohydrates, plasma, physiology, acid, menstrual cycle, unsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acid, diet, micronutrients, lipids, metabolism, sex factors, fatty acids, women, young men, origins, docosahexaenoic acids, protein, fatty acid, phosphatidylcholines, male, human, aged, humans, blood, cholesterol esters, carbohydrate, nonesterified, food habits, health, disease, developmental origins, men, hypothesis, female, administration & dosage, alpha-linolenic acid

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60883
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60883
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 6188134f-c1f3-431d-b592-12dd498683a3
ORCID for G.C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Sep 2008
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 02:01

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