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Association of diarrhoea in childhood with blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older age: analyses of two UK cohort studies

Association of diarrhoea in childhood with blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older age: analyses of two UK cohort studies
Association of diarrhoea in childhood with blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older age: analyses of two UK cohort studies
BACKGROUND: There is a suggestion that acute dehydration in childhood may lead to elevated blood pressure. We examined if episodes of diarrhoea in childhood, a recognized proxy for acute dehydration, were related to measured blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older adults. METHODS: Data were pooled from two prospective UK cohort studies (participants born 1920-39) in which episodes of diarrhoea were ascertained from health visitor records from birth until 5 years of age. Blood pressure and coronary heart disease were assessed during medical examination in men and women over 64 years of age. In total, 5203 men and women had data on diarrhoea in early life, adult blood pressure and a range of covariates; 4181 of these also had data on coronary heart disease status. RESULTS: The prevalence of diarrhoea in infancy (3.3%) and between 1 and 5 years (1.1%) was low. There was no relation of diarrhoea from either period (age- and sex-adjusted results for diarrhoea in infancy presented here) with measured blood pressure [coefficient for systolic; 95% CI (confidence interval): 0.44; -2.88-3.76] or coronary heart disease (Odds ratio, OR; 95% CI: 0.91; 0.54-1.54) in adulthood. There was a similar lack of association when hypertension was the outcome of interest. These observations were unchanged after adjustment for a range of covariates. CONCLUSIONS: In the largest study to date to examine the relation, there was no evidence that diarrhoea in early life had an influence on measured blood pressure, hypertension or coronary heart disease in older adults.
public health, coronary heart disease, adult, cohort, cohort studies, heart, cardiovascular disease, blood, disease, odds ratio, health, hypertension, childhood, blood pressure, hertfordshire, methods, birth, early-life, prevalence, women
0300-5771
1349-1355
Batty, G. David
605ce199-493d-4238-b9c8-a2c076672e83
Smith, George Davey
f5bc8327-f2cb-49a0-8eae-4a6ba63207a2
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Batty, G. David
605ce199-493d-4238-b9c8-a2c076672e83
Smith, George Davey
f5bc8327-f2cb-49a0-8eae-4a6ba63207a2
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Sayer, Avan Aihie
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8

Batty, G. David, Smith, George Davey, Fall, Caroline H.D., Sayer, Avan Aihie, Dennison, Elaine, Cooper, Cyrus and Gale, Catharine R. (2007) Association of diarrhoea in childhood with blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older age: analyses of two UK cohort studies. International journal of epidemiology, 36 (6), 1349-1355. (doi:10.1093/ije/dym178).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a suggestion that acute dehydration in childhood may lead to elevated blood pressure. We examined if episodes of diarrhoea in childhood, a recognized proxy for acute dehydration, were related to measured blood pressure and coronary heart disease in older adults. METHODS: Data were pooled from two prospective UK cohort studies (participants born 1920-39) in which episodes of diarrhoea were ascertained from health visitor records from birth until 5 years of age. Blood pressure and coronary heart disease were assessed during medical examination in men and women over 64 years of age. In total, 5203 men and women had data on diarrhoea in early life, adult blood pressure and a range of covariates; 4181 of these also had data on coronary heart disease status. RESULTS: The prevalence of diarrhoea in infancy (3.3%) and between 1 and 5 years (1.1%) was low. There was no relation of diarrhoea from either period (age- and sex-adjusted results for diarrhoea in infancy presented here) with measured blood pressure [coefficient for systolic; 95% CI (confidence interval): 0.44; -2.88-3.76] or coronary heart disease (Odds ratio, OR; 95% CI: 0.91; 0.54-1.54) in adulthood. There was a similar lack of association when hypertension was the outcome of interest. These observations were unchanged after adjustment for a range of covariates. CONCLUSIONS: In the largest study to date to examine the relation, there was no evidence that diarrhoea in early life had an influence on measured blood pressure, hypertension or coronary heart disease in older adults.

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More information

Published date: December 2007
Keywords: public health, coronary heart disease, adult, cohort, cohort studies, heart, cardiovascular disease, blood, disease, odds ratio, health, hypertension, childhood, blood pressure, hertfordshire, methods, birth, early-life, prevalence, women

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60898
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60898
ISSN: 0300-5771
PURE UUID: 6b22a476-ee12-44e5-9ee8-1aba409de252
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Catharine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638

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Date deposited: 31 Mar 2009
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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