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The application of human bone marrow stromal cells and poly(dl-lactic acid) as a biological bone graft extender in impaction bone grafting

The application of human bone marrow stromal cells and poly(dl-lactic acid) as a biological bone graft extender in impaction bone grafting
The application of human bone marrow stromal cells and poly(dl-lactic acid) as a biological bone graft extender in impaction bone grafting
Concerns over disease transmission, high costs and limited supply have led to interest in synthetic grafts in the field of impaction bone grafting (IBG). Poly(DL-lactic acid) (PLA) grafts are attractive alternatives due to their biocompatibility, established safety and versatile manufacturing process. This study examined the potential of PLA scaffolds augmented with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) in IBG. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed on impacted morsellised PLA seeded with HBMSC and compared to PLA alone. In vitro samples were incubated under osteogenic conditions and in vivo samples were implanted subcutaneously into severely compromised immunodeficient mice, for 4 weeks. Biochemical, histological, mechanical and 3D micro-computed tomography analyses were performed. HBMSC viability, biochemical activity and histological evidence of osteogenic cellular differentiation, post-impaction were observed in vitro and in vivo in PLA/HBMSC samples compared to impacted PLA alone. In vitro PLA/HBMSC samples demonstrated evidence of mechanical enhancement over PLA alone. In vivo studies showed a significant increase in new bone and blood vessel formation in the PLA/HBMSC constructs compared to PLA alone. With alternatives to allograft being sought, these studies have demonstrated PLA/HBMSC living composites, to be a potential prospect as a biological bone graft extender for future use in the field of IBG.
human development, stem cells, activity, bone marrow, bone, disease, blood, stromal cells, development, mice, safety, regeneration, human, acid, research, in-vitro
0142-9612
3221-3227
Bolland, B.J.
c8fd42ef-2524-4eaf-b1d4-10281cdedebb
Kanczler, J.M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Ginty, P.J.
af21d284-462a-4148-af85-eed1646f3b8e
Howdle, S.M.
9aaf52a9-58ae-4811-947a-0498f153cfa5
Shakesheff, K.M.
9e3f7c5c-9191-40b6-b7b3-f454110a7950
Dunlop, D.G.
5f8d8b5c-e516-48b8-831f-c6e5529a52cc
Oreffo, R.O.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Bolland, B.J.
c8fd42ef-2524-4eaf-b1d4-10281cdedebb
Kanczler, J.M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Ginty, P.J.
af21d284-462a-4148-af85-eed1646f3b8e
Howdle, S.M.
9aaf52a9-58ae-4811-947a-0498f153cfa5
Shakesheff, K.M.
9e3f7c5c-9191-40b6-b7b3-f454110a7950
Dunlop, D.G.
5f8d8b5c-e516-48b8-831f-c6e5529a52cc
Oreffo, R.O.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778

Bolland, B.J., Kanczler, J.M., Ginty, P.J., Howdle, S.M., Shakesheff, K.M., Dunlop, D.G. and Oreffo, R.O. (2008) The application of human bone marrow stromal cells and poly(dl-lactic acid) as a biological bone graft extender in impaction bone grafting. Biomaterials, 29 (22), 3221-3227. (doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2008.04.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Concerns over disease transmission, high costs and limited supply have led to interest in synthetic grafts in the field of impaction bone grafting (IBG). Poly(DL-lactic acid) (PLA) grafts are attractive alternatives due to their biocompatibility, established safety and versatile manufacturing process. This study examined the potential of PLA scaffolds augmented with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) in IBG. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed on impacted morsellised PLA seeded with HBMSC and compared to PLA alone. In vitro samples were incubated under osteogenic conditions and in vivo samples were implanted subcutaneously into severely compromised immunodeficient mice, for 4 weeks. Biochemical, histological, mechanical and 3D micro-computed tomography analyses were performed. HBMSC viability, biochemical activity and histological evidence of osteogenic cellular differentiation, post-impaction were observed in vitro and in vivo in PLA/HBMSC samples compared to impacted PLA alone. In vitro PLA/HBMSC samples demonstrated evidence of mechanical enhancement over PLA alone. In vivo studies showed a significant increase in new bone and blood vessel formation in the PLA/HBMSC constructs compared to PLA alone. With alternatives to allograft being sought, these studies have demonstrated PLA/HBMSC living composites, to be a potential prospect as a biological bone graft extender for future use in the field of IBG.

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More information

Published date: August 2008
Keywords: human development, stem cells, activity, bone marrow, bone, disease, blood, stromal cells, development, mice, safety, regeneration, human, acid, research, in-vitro

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60923
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60923
ISSN: 0142-9612
PURE UUID: 75e1d159-48c0-4c74-8036-6e93a21675c5
ORCID for J.M. Kanczler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-0414
ORCID for R.O. Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Sep 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:48

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Contributors

Author: B.J. Bolland
Author: J.M. Kanczler ORCID iD
Author: P.J. Ginty
Author: S.M. Howdle
Author: K.M. Shakesheff
Author: D.G. Dunlop
Author: R.O. Oreffo ORCID iD

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