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Lack of effect of meal fatty acid composition on postprandial lipid, glucose and insulin responses in men and women aged 50-65 years consuming their habitual diets

Lack of effect of meal fatty acid composition on postprandial lipid, glucose and insulin responses in men and women aged 50-65 years consuming their habitual diets
Lack of effect of meal fatty acid composition on postprandial lipid, glucose and insulin responses in men and women aged 50-65 years consuming their habitual diets
The aim of the study was to determine the effect of consuming meals with different fatty acid compositions on the postprandial changes over 6 h in plasma triacylglycerol, NEFA, total cholesterol, glucose and insulin concentrations in middle-aged men and women. Men (n 11; 58 (5) years) and women (n 11; 56 (4) years) consumed four test meals with a similar macronutrient energy content in random order: a reference meal based on the habitual pattern of fatty acid intake in the UK, a meal with an increased (155 %) linoleic acid (LA) to alpha-linolenic acid (alphaLNA) ratio (high LA:alphaLNA), a meal with increased (23 %) MUFA content (high MUFA) and a meal with increased (583 %) EPA and DHA content (high EPA+DHA). The high-LA:alphaLNA and high-EPA+DHA meals selectively increased the ratio of LA to alphaLNA (men 341 %; women 310 %) and the EPA+DHA (men 414 %; women 438 %) concentration in plasma triacylglycerol. The high-MUFA meal did not alter the change in MUFA content of the plasma. Plasma triacylglycerol, NEFA, glucose and insulin, but not total cholesterol, concentrations changed significantly after each meal. There was no significant effect of meal fatty acid composition or gender on maximum change in concentration, time to maximum concentration or area under the curve of any of the metabolites measured in the blood. These results suggest that differences in meal fatty acid composition exert little or no effect on postprandial changes in plasma lipids, glucose and insulin concentrations
eicosapentaenoic acid, monounsaturated, fatty acids, insulin, docosahexaenoic acids, sex factors, cholesterol, blood glucose, fatty acid, no, research, male, female, responses, human, nutrition, blood, linoleic acid, middle aged, postprandial period, analysis, women, diet, nonesterified, glucose, unsaturated, plasma, lipids, triglycerides, men, administration & dosage, acid, aged, gender, time, humans, food analysis, alpha-linolenic acid
0007-1145
489-500
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Powell, J.
1d6c27f4-dc09-4347-b580-df054b2f9cc9
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Powell, J.
1d6c27f4-dc09-4347-b580-df054b2f9cc9
Calder, P.C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Burdge, G.C., Powell, J. and Calder, P.C. (2006) Lack of effect of meal fatty acid composition on postprandial lipid, glucose and insulin responses in men and women aged 50-65 years consuming their habitual diets. British Journal of Nutrition, 96 (3), 489-500.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the effect of consuming meals with different fatty acid compositions on the postprandial changes over 6 h in plasma triacylglycerol, NEFA, total cholesterol, glucose and insulin concentrations in middle-aged men and women. Men (n 11; 58 (5) years) and women (n 11; 56 (4) years) consumed four test meals with a similar macronutrient energy content in random order: a reference meal based on the habitual pattern of fatty acid intake in the UK, a meal with an increased (155 %) linoleic acid (LA) to alpha-linolenic acid (alphaLNA) ratio (high LA:alphaLNA), a meal with increased (23 %) MUFA content (high MUFA) and a meal with increased (583 %) EPA and DHA content (high EPA+DHA). The high-LA:alphaLNA and high-EPA+DHA meals selectively increased the ratio of LA to alphaLNA (men 341 %; women 310 %) and the EPA+DHA (men 414 %; women 438 %) concentration in plasma triacylglycerol. The high-MUFA meal did not alter the change in MUFA content of the plasma. Plasma triacylglycerol, NEFA, glucose and insulin, but not total cholesterol, concentrations changed significantly after each meal. There was no significant effect of meal fatty acid composition or gender on maximum change in concentration, time to maximum concentration or area under the curve of any of the metabolites measured in the blood. These results suggest that differences in meal fatty acid composition exert little or no effect on postprandial changes in plasma lipids, glucose and insulin concentrations

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: eicosapentaenoic acid, monounsaturated, fatty acids, insulin, docosahexaenoic acids, sex factors, cholesterol, blood glucose, fatty acid, no, research, male, female, responses, human, nutrition, blood, linoleic acid, middle aged, postprandial period, analysis, women, diet, nonesterified, glucose, unsaturated, plasma, lipids, triglycerides, men, administration & dosage, acid, aged, gender, time, humans, food analysis, alpha-linolenic acid

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 60938
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/60938
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 969f3e5a-69df-4cc9-94ca-18452c41792c
ORCID for G.C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:54

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