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Cesarean section and postnatal sexual health

Cesarean section and postnatal sexual health
Cesarean section and postnatal sexual health
Background: Cesarean delivery avoids perineal trauma and has therefore often been assumed to protect sexual function after childbirth. We sought to examine this assumption by using data from a study of women's sexual health after childbirth to assess whether women who underwent cesarean section experienced better sexual health in the postnatal period than women with vaginal births. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted of 796 primiparous women, employing data from obstetric records and a postal survey 6 months after delivery. Results: Any protective effect of cesarean section on sexual function was limited to the early postnatal period (0-3 months), primarily to dyspareunia-related symptoms. At 6 months the differences in dyspareunia-related symptoms, sexual response-related symptoms, and postcoital problems were much reduced or reversed, and none reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Outcomes from this study provide no basis for advocating cesarean section as a way to protect women's sexual function after childbirth
cross-sectional studies, outcomes, time, care, cesarean section, demand, nhs, england, birth, childbirth, mothers, delivery, symptoms, health, mode, methods, women, london, publishing, pelvic floor
0730-7659
306-311
Barrett, G.
65356edf-469f-4d47-8545-4b8f9941aeff
Peacock, J.
1781aee1-ae33-47d3-8777-0c98f276f0ff
Victor, C.R.
5341326e-b945-42c1-becf-421fef7ca3e2
Manyonda, I.
71a2ceec-cba4-4cec-aad5-b065361394b6
Barrett, G.
65356edf-469f-4d47-8545-4b8f9941aeff
Peacock, J.
1781aee1-ae33-47d3-8777-0c98f276f0ff
Victor, C.R.
5341326e-b945-42c1-becf-421fef7ca3e2
Manyonda, I.
71a2ceec-cba4-4cec-aad5-b065361394b6

Barrett, G., Peacock, J., Victor, C.R. and Manyonda, I. (2005) Cesarean section and postnatal sexual health. Birth, 32 (4), 306-311.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Cesarean delivery avoids perineal trauma and has therefore often been assumed to protect sexual function after childbirth. We sought to examine this assumption by using data from a study of women's sexual health after childbirth to assess whether women who underwent cesarean section experienced better sexual health in the postnatal period than women with vaginal births. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted of 796 primiparous women, employing data from obstetric records and a postal survey 6 months after delivery. Results: Any protective effect of cesarean section on sexual function was limited to the early postnatal period (0-3 months), primarily to dyspareunia-related symptoms. At 6 months the differences in dyspareunia-related symptoms, sexual response-related symptoms, and postcoital problems were much reduced or reversed, and none reached statistical significance. Conclusions: Outcomes from this study provide no basis for advocating cesarean section as a way to protect women's sexual function after childbirth

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: cross-sectional studies, outcomes, time, care, cesarean section, demand, nhs, england, birth, childbirth, mothers, delivery, symptoms, health, mode, methods, women, london, publishing, pelvic floor
Organisations: Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 61657
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/61657
ISSN: 0730-7659
PURE UUID: 94a9caae-4437-4303-9a8b-2da6019b1ac4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:28

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