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The development and implementation of NHS treatment centres as an organisational innovation

The development and implementation of NHS treatment centres as an organisational innovation
The development and implementation of NHS treatment centres as an organisational innovation
The idea for Treatment Centres was first heralded in the NHS Plan (DH, 2000). From a planned small scale introduction of four ‘Diagnostic and Treatment Centres’ (soon renamed as Treatment Centres) in 2001, the plan was to increase the number, range of services and type of provider (with the introduction of the private sector) so that 50 TCs would be operational by 2004/05 (DH,2002). Using the existing Ambulatory Care and Diagnostic Centre at Central Middlesex Hospital (London) and models of surgicentres (developed overseas) as prototypes, the TC model was innovative as it proposed a ‘one-stop shop’ for planned (nonemergency) care. Patients could obtain diagnostic and treatment services under one roof. TCs aimed to reduce inappropriate delays and waiting lists through the separation of elective surgery from emergency and unplanned treatment. By focussing on high volume and routine surgical procedures in orthopaedics, gynaecology, ophthalmology and cardiology, TCs sought to increase efficiency by delivering high volumes of activity and high quality health care using modern methods. This proposed service development was timely for NHS change managers who were seeking ways to make progress towards national waiting time targets and to introduce more patientcentred models of care.Whilst many had not previously considered the TC model, they were eager to explore its advantages at a local level.
delivery, treatment, implementation, nhs, innovation
Service Delivery and Organisation Programme: National Institute for Health Research
Bate, Paul
a3821a9e-1e7b-498b-b58b-d0c6ff0b068a
Robert, Gabbay
947f679b-eb75-40aa-a2b4-648aac26f09f
Gallivan, Steve
714f23d9-d1fb-4297-9f2c-625ad463f7ca
Jit, Mark
c99d1e17-a445-4ac7-8b56-ba179ebf5190
Utley, Martin
c7107f2e-7a18-41d3-92c2-cea48151dfbc
Le May, Andree
d31b0269-60f6-47cd-a844-f0bc522662ab
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607
Bate, Paul
a3821a9e-1e7b-498b-b58b-d0c6ff0b068a
Robert, Gabbay
947f679b-eb75-40aa-a2b4-648aac26f09f
Gallivan, Steve
714f23d9-d1fb-4297-9f2c-625ad463f7ca
Jit, Mark
c99d1e17-a445-4ac7-8b56-ba179ebf5190
Utley, Martin
c7107f2e-7a18-41d3-92c2-cea48151dfbc
Le May, Andree
d31b0269-60f6-47cd-a844-f0bc522662ab
Pope, Catherine
21ae1290-0838-4245-adcf-6f901a0d4607

Bate, Paul, Robert, Gabbay, Gallivan, Steve, Jit, Mark, Utley, Martin, Le May, Andree and Pope, Catherine (2008) The development and implementation of NHS treatment centres as an organisational innovation London, UK. Service Delivery and Organisation Programme: National Institute for Health Research 7pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

The idea for Treatment Centres was first heralded in the NHS Plan (DH, 2000). From a planned small scale introduction of four ‘Diagnostic and Treatment Centres’ (soon renamed as Treatment Centres) in 2001, the plan was to increase the number, range of services and type of provider (with the introduction of the private sector) so that 50 TCs would be operational by 2004/05 (DH,2002). Using the existing Ambulatory Care and Diagnostic Centre at Central Middlesex Hospital (London) and models of surgicentres (developed overseas) as prototypes, the TC model was innovative as it proposed a ‘one-stop shop’ for planned (nonemergency) care. Patients could obtain diagnostic and treatment services under one roof. TCs aimed to reduce inappropriate delays and waiting lists through the separation of elective surgery from emergency and unplanned treatment. By focussing on high volume and routine surgical procedures in orthopaedics, gynaecology, ophthalmology and cardiology, TCs sought to increase efficiency by delivering high volumes of activity and high quality health care using modern methods. This proposed service development was timely for NHS change managers who were seeking ways to make progress towards national waiting time targets and to introduce more patientcentred models of care.Whilst many had not previously considered the TC model, they were eager to explore its advantages at a local level.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 22 March 2008
Keywords: delivery, treatment, implementation, nhs, innovation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 61660
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/61660
PURE UUID: 9b439c75-87f7-425f-858b-68102e415e3b
ORCID for Catherine Pope: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8935-6702

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Apr 2009
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:43

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Contributors

Author: Paul Bate
Author: Gabbay Robert
Author: Steve Gallivan
Author: Mark Jit
Author: Martin Utley
Author: Andree Le May
Author: Catherine Pope ORCID iD

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