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Evidence-Based health care and the implementation gap

Evidence-Based health care and the implementation gap
Evidence-Based health care and the implementation gap
Health services can and should be improved by applying research findings about best practice. Yet, in Knowledge to Action?, the authors explore why it nevertheless proves notoriously difficult to implement change based on research evidence in the face of strong professional views and complex organizational structures. The book draws on a large body of evidence acquired in the course of nearly fifty in-depth case studies, following attempts to introduce evidence-based practice in the UK NHS over more than a decade. Using qualitative methods to study hospital and primary care settings, they are able to shed light on why some of these attempts succeeded where others faltered. By opening up the intricacies and complexities of change in the NHS, they reveal the limitations of the simplistic approaches to implementing research or introducing evidence-based health care. A unique synthesis of evidence, the book brings together data from 1,400 interviews with doctors, nurses, and managers, as well as detailed observations and documentary analysis. The authors provide an analysis, rooted in a range of theoretical perspectives, that underlines the intimate links between organizational structures and cultures and the utilization of knowledge, and draws conclusions which will be of significance for other areas of public management. Their findings have implications for the utilization of knowledge insituations where there is a professional tradition working within a politically sensitive blend of public service, managerial accountability, and technical expertise. Knowledge to Action? will be of interest to Academics, Researchers, and Advanced Students of Organizational Behaviour, Public and Health Management, and Evidence-Based Medicine; and also of particular interest to Practitioners, Clinicians, and Public Health Managers concerned with implementing change to clinical practice.
implementation, health, care
0199259011
36-45
Oxford University Press
Dopson, Sue
c47fd52d-5e57-4d38-8595-99889619d961
Locock, Louise
5a386f03-e28a-4db8-bfb3-fc46b1e6dccd
Gabbay, John
d779b76c-febe-461b-b3bb-e110163f114a
Fitzgerald, Louise
765b3b06-cc84-4d9f-9b32-5d8464187745
Dopson, Sue
Fitzgerald, Louise
Dopson, Sue
c47fd52d-5e57-4d38-8595-99889619d961
Locock, Louise
5a386f03-e28a-4db8-bfb3-fc46b1e6dccd
Gabbay, John
d779b76c-febe-461b-b3bb-e110163f114a
Fitzgerald, Louise
765b3b06-cc84-4d9f-9b32-5d8464187745
Dopson, Sue
Fitzgerald, Louise

Dopson, Sue, Locock, Louise, Gabbay, John and Fitzgerald, Louise (2005) Evidence-Based health care and the implementation gap. In, Dopson, Sue and Fitzgerald, Louise (eds.) Knowledge to Action?: Evidence-based Health Care in Context. Oxford University Press, pp. 36-45.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Health services can and should be improved by applying research findings about best practice. Yet, in Knowledge to Action?, the authors explore why it nevertheless proves notoriously difficult to implement change based on research evidence in the face of strong professional views and complex organizational structures. The book draws on a large body of evidence acquired in the course of nearly fifty in-depth case studies, following attempts to introduce evidence-based practice in the UK NHS over more than a decade. Using qualitative methods to study hospital and primary care settings, they are able to shed light on why some of these attempts succeeded where others faltered. By opening up the intricacies and complexities of change in the NHS, they reveal the limitations of the simplistic approaches to implementing research or introducing evidence-based health care. A unique synthesis of evidence, the book brings together data from 1,400 interviews with doctors, nurses, and managers, as well as detailed observations and documentary analysis. The authors provide an analysis, rooted in a range of theoretical perspectives, that underlines the intimate links between organizational structures and cultures and the utilization of knowledge, and draws conclusions which will be of significance for other areas of public management. Their findings have implications for the utilization of knowledge insituations where there is a professional tradition working within a politically sensitive blend of public service, managerial accountability, and technical expertise. Knowledge to Action? will be of interest to Academics, Researchers, and Advanced Students of Organizational Behaviour, Public and Health Management, and Evidence-Based Medicine; and also of particular interest to Practitioners, Clinicians, and Public Health Managers concerned with implementing change to clinical practice.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Keywords: implementation, health, care

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 61763
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/61763
ISBN: 0199259011
PURE UUID: d8187b1d-92bc-472e-861f-7030d3b1db0f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2008
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 18:06

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Contributors

Author: Sue Dopson
Author: Louise Locock
Author: John Gabbay
Author: Louise Fitzgerald
Editor: Sue Dopson
Editor: Louise Fitzgerald

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