The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Compensating occupationally related tenosynovitis and epicondylitis: a literature review

Compensating occupationally related tenosynovitis and epicondylitis: a literature review
Compensating occupationally related tenosynovitis and epicondylitis: a literature review
OBJECTIVES: To assess occupational associations with tenosynovitis and epicondylitis, we conducted a systematic literature review. We focused particularly on evidence that might support compensation of these disorders 'on the balance of probabilities'. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic biomedical databases to 1 January 2005 using combinations of keyword and medical subject headings, and also the references cited in two state-of-the-art reviews from the 1990s. Primary research reports were retrieved and checked for further relevant citations. From each paper, we abstracted a standardized set of information on study populations, exposure contrasts and estimates of effect. RESULTS: We found and summarized 18 papers. In the main, these based analysis on job titles rather than on directly assessed physical activities. Few occupations were studied more than once, however, and there was little consistent evidence of jobs or work activities that carried more than a doubling of risk for either disorder. CONCLUSION: Compensation of occupational illness can be problematic for disorders that are not specific to work and for which there are no distinctive clinical features in occupationally related cases. Attribution can, however, be made on the balance of probabilities if there is convincing evidence that risk is at least doubled in an occupational group. Our review highlights the relative lack of data to support such attribution for tenosynovitis and epicondylitis, and discusses the difficulty of compensating upper limb disorders
activity, humans, report, research, probability, review, combination, tennis elbow, paper, literature, occupational diseases, occupations, exertion, population, databases, tenosynovitis, risk factors, exposure, epidemiology, analysis, workers' compensation, medline, research support, etiology, risk, methods
0962-7480
67-74
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Harris, E. Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Harris, E. Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Palmer, Keith T., Harris, E. Clare and Coggon, David (2007) Compensating occupationally related tenosynovitis and epicondylitis: a literature review. Occupational Medicine, 57 (1), 67-74. (doi:10.1093/occmed/kql127).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess occupational associations with tenosynovitis and epicondylitis, we conducted a systematic literature review. We focused particularly on evidence that might support compensation of these disorders 'on the balance of probabilities'. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic biomedical databases to 1 January 2005 using combinations of keyword and medical subject headings, and also the references cited in two state-of-the-art reviews from the 1990s. Primary research reports were retrieved and checked for further relevant citations. From each paper, we abstracted a standardized set of information on study populations, exposure contrasts and estimates of effect. RESULTS: We found and summarized 18 papers. In the main, these based analysis on job titles rather than on directly assessed physical activities. Few occupations were studied more than once, however, and there was little consistent evidence of jobs or work activities that carried more than a doubling of risk for either disorder. CONCLUSION: Compensation of occupational illness can be problematic for disorders that are not specific to work and for which there are no distinctive clinical features in occupationally related cases. Attribution can, however, be made on the balance of probabilities if there is convincing evidence that risk is at least doubled in an occupational group. Our review highlights the relative lack of data to support such attribution for tenosynovitis and epicondylitis, and discusses the difficulty of compensating upper limb disorders

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 1 January 2007
Keywords: activity, humans, report, research, probability, review, combination, tennis elbow, paper, literature, occupational diseases, occupations, exertion, population, databases, tenosynovitis, risk factors, exposure, epidemiology, analysis, workers' compensation, medline, research support, etiology, risk, methods

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62035
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62035
ISSN: 0962-7480
PURE UUID: 3f487266-a18a-4222-9fc1-599db0260e54
ORCID for E. Clare Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8037-566X
ORCID for David Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2008
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:51

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Keith T. Palmer
Author: E. Clare Harris ORCID iD
Author: David Coggon ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×