The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Health-related job loss: findings from a community-based survey

Health-related job loss: findings from a community-based survey
Health-related job loss: findings from a community-based survey
AIMS: To explore the frequency, nature, determinants and outcome of health-related job loss (HRJL) in men sampled from the general population of three rural areas.
METHODS: Data on lifetime occupational history, including any HRJL, were obtained as part of a postal survey of men aged 24-70 years in three rural areas of England and Wales. Incidence rates were calculated for first health-related loss of a job that had been held for >or=1 year. Associations with risk factors were examined by Poisson regression, and by application of conditional logistic regression in a nested case-control study.
RESULTS: HRJL was reported by 1408 (13%) of the 10 559 men who had held long-term jobs. The incidence rose steeply with age for cardiorespiratory and neurological disorders, but for accidents and poisoning the trend was, if anything, in the reverse direction. An increase in incidence over time was most marked for musculoskeletal disorders and mental illness, and much less prominent for cardiorespiratory and neurological disease. In comparison with other occupations, the risk was lower in agricultural workers (odds ratio (OR) 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.8), and higher in policemen (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.7) and teachers (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5 to 2.7), this differential being even greater for HRJL caused by mental illness. Risk was also increased in employees relative to the self-employed (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.3). Shift work was associated with a higher incidence of job loss caused by mental illness (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.2), and heavy lifting with HRJL caused by musculoskeletal disorders (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0 to 3.5). After HRJL, 61% of subjects had subsequently obtained further long-term employment, usually within 1 year.
CONCLUSIONS: In the population studied, HRJL has become increasingly common, especially in relation to musculoskeletal disorders and mental illness. In addition to being associated with ergonomic stresses in the workplace, it may be importantly influenced by cultural and economic factors. Future research should focus on the minority of workers who leave a job for health reasons and do not rapidly return to further work.
unemployment, logistic models, stress, statistics & numerical data, disease, population, England and Wales, occupations, risk factors, male, odds ratio, case-control studies, middle aged, humans, epidemiology, incidence, history, occupational health, research, England, time, research support, employment, wales, adult, aged, comparative study, health, risk, rural population, lifting, methods, poisson distribution
1351-0711
144-149
Solomon, C.
47ebc25c-aae1-4434-a4cf-6f30c0a4b773
Poole, J.
d6c5377d-ac31-4552-8108-e5bd16f9fd00
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Solomon, C.
47ebc25c-aae1-4434-a4cf-6f30c0a4b773
Poole, J.
d6c5377d-ac31-4552-8108-e5bd16f9fd00
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Solomon, C., Poole, J., Palmer, K.T. and Coggon, D. (2007) Health-related job loss: findings from a community-based survey. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 64 (3), 144-149. (doi:10.1136/oem.2005.024257).

Record type: Article

Abstract

AIMS: To explore the frequency, nature, determinants and outcome of health-related job loss (HRJL) in men sampled from the general population of three rural areas.
METHODS: Data on lifetime occupational history, including any HRJL, were obtained as part of a postal survey of men aged 24-70 years in three rural areas of England and Wales. Incidence rates were calculated for first health-related loss of a job that had been held for >or=1 year. Associations with risk factors were examined by Poisson regression, and by application of conditional logistic regression in a nested case-control study.
RESULTS: HRJL was reported by 1408 (13%) of the 10 559 men who had held long-term jobs. The incidence rose steeply with age for cardiorespiratory and neurological disorders, but for accidents and poisoning the trend was, if anything, in the reverse direction. An increase in incidence over time was most marked for musculoskeletal disorders and mental illness, and much less prominent for cardiorespiratory and neurological disease. In comparison with other occupations, the risk was lower in agricultural workers (odds ratio (OR) 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.8), and higher in policemen (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.7) and teachers (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5 to 2.7), this differential being even greater for HRJL caused by mental illness. Risk was also increased in employees relative to the self-employed (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.3). Shift work was associated with a higher incidence of job loss caused by mental illness (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.2), and heavy lifting with HRJL caused by musculoskeletal disorders (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0 to 3.5). After HRJL, 61% of subjects had subsequently obtained further long-term employment, usually within 1 year.
CONCLUSIONS: In the population studied, HRJL has become increasingly common, especially in relation to musculoskeletal disorders and mental illness. In addition to being associated with ergonomic stresses in the workplace, it may be importantly influenced by cultural and economic factors. Future research should focus on the minority of workers who leave a job for health reasons and do not rapidly return to further work.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2007
Keywords: unemployment, logistic models, stress, statistics & numerical data, disease, population, England and Wales, occupations, risk factors, male, odds ratio, case-control studies, middle aged, humans, epidemiology, incidence, history, occupational health, research, England, time, research support, employment, wales, adult, aged, comparative study, health, risk, rural population, lifting, methods, poisson distribution

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62138
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62138
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 611b7eff-8f79-48b4-a69c-f786b93c8fa0
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2008
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:40

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: C. Solomon
Author: J. Poole
Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×