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Can health technologies be assessed using routine data?

Can health technologies be assessed using routine data?
Can health technologies be assessed using routine data?
Objectives: The potential of routine data for health technology assessment (HTA) in the United Kingdom was assessed.
Methods: Compiled were a comprehensive list of routine databases, their classification according to data characteristics, literature review on their current use, and their comparison with key topics identified as priorities for HTA.
Results: Two hundred seventy health-care databases for England or the English regions were identified. Twenty-four included data on both health technology and patient health state. Eleven found some published use in effectiveness evaluation. Of 140 prioritized health technologies, only 22 could be identified in routine databases.
Conclusions: Routine data are plentiful but of limited use in HTA. The data sets usually do not include the effect of treatments. Coding is inadequate, and confidentiality regulations will make matters worse. Both need urgent attention.
routine data, administrative data, health technology assessment, health-care evaluation, disease registers, registries
0266-4623
96-103
Stevens, Andrew J.
3068ebfb-c72e-4b36-b192-0b70e9daa524
Raftery, James
27c2661d-6c4f-448a-bf36-9a89ec72bd6b
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Stevens, Andrew J.
3068ebfb-c72e-4b36-b192-0b70e9daa524
Raftery, James
27c2661d-6c4f-448a-bf36-9a89ec72bd6b
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a

Stevens, Andrew J., Raftery, James and Roderick, Paul (2005) Can health technologies be assessed using routine data? International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 21 (1), 96-103. (doi:10.1017/S0266462305050129).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: The potential of routine data for health technology assessment (HTA) in the United Kingdom was assessed.
Methods: Compiled were a comprehensive list of routine databases, their classification according to data characteristics, literature review on their current use, and their comparison with key topics identified as priorities for HTA.
Results: Two hundred seventy health-care databases for England or the English regions were identified. Twenty-four included data on both health technology and patient health state. Eleven found some published use in effectiveness evaluation. Of 140 prioritized health technologies, only 22 could be identified in routine databases.
Conclusions: Routine data are plentiful but of limited use in HTA. The data sets usually do not include the effect of treatments. Coding is inadequate, and confidentiality regulations will make matters worse. Both need urgent attention.

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More information

Published date: 2 March 2005
Keywords: routine data, administrative data, health technology assessment, health-care evaluation, disease registers, registries

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62152
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62152
ISSN: 0266-4623
PURE UUID: fdb8da35-e4d1-4932-b7ca-c2f78c6f389d
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2008
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:47

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Contributors

Author: Andrew J. Stevens
Author: James Raftery
Author: Paul Roderick ORCID iD

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