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High-dose fish oil and antioxidants in Crohn's disease and the response of bone turnover: a randomised controlled trial

High-dose fish oil and antioxidants in Crohn's disease and the response of bone turnover: a randomised controlled trial
High-dose fish oil and antioxidants in Crohn's disease and the response of bone turnover: a randomised controlled trial
Crohn's disease is associated with altered bone turnover that may be influenced by nutritional status, the systemic inflammatory response, cytokine production by circulating (peripheral blood) mononuclear cells (PBMC) and antioxidant micronutrient intake. High-dose fish oil is associated with reductions in disease relapse and inflammatory markers, and modulates PBMC function. The effect of fish oil plus antioxidants on bone turnover and PBMC function (the production of interferon-gamma and prostaglandin E2) in Crohn's disease was investigated in a randomised-controlled trial. Patients with currently or recently raised biochemical markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein > or = 6.9 mg/l or erythrocyte sedimentation rate > or =18 mm/h) received fish oil (providing 2.7 g/d EPA and DHA) and antioxidants (vitamins A, C and E, and Se) (n 31) or placebo (n 30) for 24 weeks. Bone turnover was assessed by measuring the concentrations of urinary deoxypyridinoline (bone resorption) and serum osteocalcin (bone formation). Fish oil plus antioxidants were associated with increases in EPA, DHA Se in plasma (all P < 0.01), and with a reduction in interferon-gamma production by mitogen-stimulated PBMC, which demonstrated a negative correlation with deoxypyridinoline/creatinine:osteocalcin ratio (r - 0.33, P = 0.009). There were no differences between the groups at 24 weeks in the response of deoxypyridinoline or osteocalcin or their ratio, or in nutritional status. Dietary supplementation in Crohn's disease with high intakes of EPA and DHA, as fish oil, plus antioxidants was associated with a modulated production of interferon-gamma by PBMC but not altered indices of bone turnover.
bone, fish oil, crohn's disease
0007-1145
253-261
Trebble, Timothy M.
48119242-d090-4778-afd9-58f451dbeecf
Stroud, Mike A.
1665ae65-0898-4848-bf0d-baec8f2bb078
Wootton, Stephen A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Fine, David R.
ce3d6a77-040e-4aec-a8f5-4c4c22431605
Mullee, Mark A.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Moniz, Caje
8b4f5ff0-1359-4d45-8370-c1faef162bc2
Arden, Nigel K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Trebble, Timothy M.
48119242-d090-4778-afd9-58f451dbeecf
Stroud, Mike A.
1665ae65-0898-4848-bf0d-baec8f2bb078
Wootton, Stephen A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Fine, David R.
ce3d6a77-040e-4aec-a8f5-4c4c22431605
Mullee, Mark A.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Moniz, Caje
8b4f5ff0-1359-4d45-8370-c1faef162bc2
Arden, Nigel K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f

Trebble, Timothy M., Stroud, Mike A., Wootton, Stephen A., Calder, Philip C., Fine, David R., Mullee, Mark A., Moniz, Caje and Arden, Nigel K. (2005) High-dose fish oil and antioxidants in Crohn's disease and the response of bone turnover: a randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 94 (2), 253-261. (doi:10.1079/BJN20051466).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Crohn's disease is associated with altered bone turnover that may be influenced by nutritional status, the systemic inflammatory response, cytokine production by circulating (peripheral blood) mononuclear cells (PBMC) and antioxidant micronutrient intake. High-dose fish oil is associated with reductions in disease relapse and inflammatory markers, and modulates PBMC function. The effect of fish oil plus antioxidants on bone turnover and PBMC function (the production of interferon-gamma and prostaglandin E2) in Crohn's disease was investigated in a randomised-controlled trial. Patients with currently or recently raised biochemical markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein > or = 6.9 mg/l or erythrocyte sedimentation rate > or =18 mm/h) received fish oil (providing 2.7 g/d EPA and DHA) and antioxidants (vitamins A, C and E, and Se) (n 31) or placebo (n 30) for 24 weeks. Bone turnover was assessed by measuring the concentrations of urinary deoxypyridinoline (bone resorption) and serum osteocalcin (bone formation). Fish oil plus antioxidants were associated with increases in EPA, DHA Se in plasma (all P < 0.01), and with a reduction in interferon-gamma production by mitogen-stimulated PBMC, which demonstrated a negative correlation with deoxypyridinoline/creatinine:osteocalcin ratio (r - 0.33, P = 0.009). There were no differences between the groups at 24 weeks in the response of deoxypyridinoline or osteocalcin or their ratio, or in nutritional status. Dietary supplementation in Crohn's disease with high intakes of EPA and DHA, as fish oil, plus antioxidants was associated with a modulated production of interferon-gamma by PBMC but not altered indices of bone turnover.

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More information

Published date: August 2005
Keywords: bone, fish oil, crohn's disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62170
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62170
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 88c343fd-de25-4139-bbc8-c2d3c5c02c5a
ORCID for Philip C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Oct 2008
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Timothy M. Trebble
Author: Mike A. Stroud
Author: David R. Fine
Author: Mark A. Mullee
Author: Caje Moniz
Author: Nigel K. Arden

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