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Symptoms of fatigue and sleepiness in major depressive disorder

Symptoms of fatigue and sleepiness in major depressive disorder
Symptoms of fatigue and sleepiness in major depressive disorder
Fatigue and sleepiness (hypersomnia) are symptoms that are highly prevalent in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Individuals who complain of fatigue but do not have diagnosable depression are at a higher risk for developing MDD later in life than individuals who do not complain of fatigue. Fatigue and sleepiness also appear to be particularly difficult to treat, as they are often encountered as residual symptoms among MDD patients who have remitted following treatment with standard antidepressants. There are 3 main approaches for addressing fatigue and sleepiness in depression: first, prescribing antidepressant medications that are less likely to exacerbate these particular symptoms; second, prescribing antidepressant medications that are more likely to resolve these symptoms; third, the use of adjunctive treatments to specifically target residual fatigue and sleepiness in depression.
bupropion sustained-release, risk, physicians, modafinil augmentation, fluoxetine, depression, major depressive disorder, psychiatric comorbidity, primary-care, placebo-controlled trial, antidepressant, double-blind, antidepressants, European-society ii, adjunctive treatment, prescribing, selective serotonin
9-15
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Papakostas, G.I.
5660d4c8-bfda-46e3-a22a-9240da92cfbb
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Papakostas, G.I.
5660d4c8-bfda-46e3-a22a-9240da92cfbb

Baldwin, D.S. and Papakostas, G.I. (2006) Symptoms of fatigue and sleepiness in major depressive disorder. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 67 (Supplement 6), 9-15.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fatigue and sleepiness (hypersomnia) are symptoms that are highly prevalent in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Individuals who complain of fatigue but do not have diagnosable depression are at a higher risk for developing MDD later in life than individuals who do not complain of fatigue. Fatigue and sleepiness also appear to be particularly difficult to treat, as they are often encountered as residual symptoms among MDD patients who have remitted following treatment with standard antidepressants. There are 3 main approaches for addressing fatigue and sleepiness in depression: first, prescribing antidepressant medications that are less likely to exacerbate these particular symptoms; second, prescribing antidepressant medications that are more likely to resolve these symptoms; third, the use of adjunctive treatments to specifically target residual fatigue and sleepiness in depression.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: bupropion sustained-release, risk, physicians, modafinil augmentation, fluoxetine, depression, major depressive disorder, psychiatric comorbidity, primary-care, placebo-controlled trial, antidepressant, double-blind, antidepressants, European-society ii, adjunctive treatment, prescribing, selective serotonin

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62264
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62264
PURE UUID: 28815763-f753-4e99-a84f-79c8a4e57bac

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Date deposited: 05 Sep 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:27

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