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The role of the immune system in clearance of Abeta from the brain

The role of the immune system in clearance of Abeta from the brain
The role of the immune system in clearance of Abeta from the brain
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is abnormal accumulation of A beta and tau proteins in the brain. There is an associated immunological response, but it is still unclear whether this is beneficial or harmful. Inflammation in AD, specifically in the form of microglial activation, has, for many years, been considered to contribute to disease progression. However, two types of evidence suggest that it may be appropriate to revise this view: first, the disappointing results of prospective clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents and, second, the observation that microglia can clear plaques in AD following A beta immunization. Although A beta immunization alters AD pathology, there is limited evidence so far of benefit to cognitive function. Immunization against microorganisms is almost always used as a method of disease prevention rather than to treat a disease process that has already started. In animal models, immunotherapy at an early age can protect against A beta accumulation and it will be interesting to see if this can usefully be applied to humans to prevent AD.
alzheimer's disease, immunization, inflammation, immune system, therapy
267-278
Boche, Delphine
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Nicoll, James A.R.
88c0685f-000e-4eb7-8f72-f36b4985e8ed
Boche, Delphine
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Nicoll, James A.R.
88c0685f-000e-4eb7-8f72-f36b4985e8ed

Boche, Delphine and Nicoll, James A.R. (2008) The role of the immune system in clearance of Abeta from the brain. Brain Pathology, 18 (2), 267-278. (doi:10.1111/j.1750-3639.2008.00134.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is abnormal accumulation of A beta and tau proteins in the brain. There is an associated immunological response, but it is still unclear whether this is beneficial or harmful. Inflammation in AD, specifically in the form of microglial activation, has, for many years, been considered to contribute to disease progression. However, two types of evidence suggest that it may be appropriate to revise this view: first, the disappointing results of prospective clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents and, second, the observation that microglia can clear plaques in AD following A beta immunization. Although A beta immunization alters AD pathology, there is limited evidence so far of benefit to cognitive function. Immunization against microorganisms is almost always used as a method of disease prevention rather than to treat a disease process that has already started. In animal models, immunotherapy at an early age can protect against A beta accumulation and it will be interesting to see if this can usefully be applied to humans to prevent AD.

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More information

Published date: April 2008
Keywords: alzheimer's disease, immunization, inflammation, immune system, therapy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62331
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62331
PURE UUID: 4ca8387f-d4e0-4241-a6f0-7b1e03403a2d
ORCID for Delphine Boche: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5884-130X
ORCID for James A.R. Nicoll: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9444-7246

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Sep 2008
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:52

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