The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Befriending patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia: can psychotic symptoms predict treatment response?

Befriending patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia: can psychotic symptoms predict treatment response?
Befriending patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia: can psychotic symptoms predict treatment response?
Objectives. Supportive interventions are used in schizophrenia, but little research has been conducted into whether any baseline variable predicts treatment response. The aim of this study was to establish if baseline delusions or hallucinations are associated with changes in overall symptoms in patients who received a befriending intervention.
Design. The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia. These patients comprised the befriending arm of a multicentre randomized controlled trial which compared the efficacy of using CBT against befriending as an adjunct to routine care for patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia.
Methods. Scores for auditory hallucinations and delusions relating to persecution or control were entered into two regression models. The dependent variables were change in overall symptoms (1) between baseline and end of the intervention, and (2) between baseline and 9 months post-intervention.
Results. Baseline delusions predicted a good response and auditory hallucinations predicted a poor response at 9 months. Conclusions. Baseline psychotic symptoms strongly predicted outcome in this sample. The finding that hallucinations predicted a poor outcome is consistent with previous research. These results may help to determine which patients would benefit from supportive interventions.
patients, treatment, schizophrenia
1476-0835
97-106
Samarasekera, N.
f0e66d1d-d60e-46ea-a420-bd29f8bd69a0
Kingdon, D.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Siddle, R.
4dccea5c-bab9-4f97-bedb-7641506c523a
O'Carroll, M.
55fa98c2-b06d-4a7e-a67e-71865930971a
Scott, J.L.
15af6b2e-2639-48b3-943a-a8ba8d0b6fd9
Sensky, T.
9ca2b6d0-57aa-43b4-b3a1-d703332db551
Barnes, T.R.
d1d261e4-fa1a-46d0-b311-47bb6a29ae52
Turkington, D.
a1e362f5-4ff3-4d27-81cb-1c6ddbcbf5b9
Samarasekera, N.
f0e66d1d-d60e-46ea-a420-bd29f8bd69a0
Kingdon, D.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Siddle, R.
4dccea5c-bab9-4f97-bedb-7641506c523a
O'Carroll, M.
55fa98c2-b06d-4a7e-a67e-71865930971a
Scott, J.L.
15af6b2e-2639-48b3-943a-a8ba8d0b6fd9
Sensky, T.
9ca2b6d0-57aa-43b4-b3a1-d703332db551
Barnes, T.R.
d1d261e4-fa1a-46d0-b311-47bb6a29ae52
Turkington, D.
a1e362f5-4ff3-4d27-81cb-1c6ddbcbf5b9

Samarasekera, N., Kingdon, D., Siddle, R., O'Carroll, M., Scott, J.L., Sensky, T., Barnes, T.R. and Turkington, D. (2007) Befriending patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia: can psychotic symptoms predict treatment response? Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 80 (1), 97-106. (doi:10.1348/147608306X108998).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives. Supportive interventions are used in schizophrenia, but little research has been conducted into whether any baseline variable predicts treatment response. The aim of this study was to establish if baseline delusions or hallucinations are associated with changes in overall symptoms in patients who received a befriending intervention.
Design. The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia. These patients comprised the befriending arm of a multicentre randomized controlled trial which compared the efficacy of using CBT against befriending as an adjunct to routine care for patients with medication-resistant schizophrenia.
Methods. Scores for auditory hallucinations and delusions relating to persecution or control were entered into two regression models. The dependent variables were change in overall symptoms (1) between baseline and end of the intervention, and (2) between baseline and 9 months post-intervention.
Results. Baseline delusions predicted a good response and auditory hallucinations predicted a poor response at 9 months. Conclusions. Baseline psychotic symptoms strongly predicted outcome in this sample. The finding that hallucinations predicted a poor outcome is consistent with previous research. These results may help to determine which patients would benefit from supportive interventions.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: March 2007
Keywords: patients, treatment, schizophrenia

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62562
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62562
ISSN: 1476-0835
PURE UUID: 247e2a5b-a770-4730-92e3-e5e61dc4d5c7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Sep 2008
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 10:06

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: N. Samarasekera
Author: D. Kingdon
Author: R. Siddle
Author: M. O'Carroll
Author: J.L. Scott
Author: T. Sensky
Author: T.R. Barnes
Author: D. Turkington

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×