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Commentary: Optimizing cancer immunotherapy trials: Back to basics

Commentary: Optimizing cancer immunotherapy trials: Back to basics
Commentary: Optimizing cancer immunotherapy trials: Back to basics
Attempts to raise effective immunity against cancer are benefiting from information on the nature of the immunity involved and its regulation and, perhaps, now it is time to step back and define our approach in molecular terms prior to clinical testing. Although there are immunological differences between mice and patients, results from murine studies are encouraging early 'translation' of concepts to the clinic and it is vital to take immunological principles emerging from mice into clinical vaccine design. One is the requirement to break tolerance against over-expressed self-antigens, a potentially risky procedure but necessary for several cancer targets. A study in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology attempts to do this by using xenogeneic antigens, albeit with variable outcome. The unstated goal is to activate T-cell help but this can be achieved more effectively by harnessing a predictable anti-microbial repertoire. The second issue lies in the delivery of antigen. One strategy is "prime/boost" using DNA priming and boosting with a viral vector; however, this induces blocking immunity against viral proteins, and must be used judiciously. There are other physical methods to increase immunity such as electroporation, which can itself be used in 'prime/boost' sequence.. These twin problems of engagement of T-cell help and delivery of adequate antigen can now be addressed by applying immunological logic to cancer vaccines.
vaccination, protein, outcome, vaccine, immunology, dna vaccines, epitope, cytotoxic t-cells, translation, cancer, dna, repertoire, t cells, immunotherapy, tumor-antigen, patient, responses, antigen, tumor immunology, cancer vaccines, electroporation, tolerance, time, immunity, t-cell, antigen processing and presentation, lymphocytes, trial
0014-2980
1070-1073
Stevenson, Freda K.
ba803747-c0ac-409f-a9c2-b61fde009f8c
Rice, Jason
d58d4fcd-8dc0-4599-bf96-62323d579227
Stevenson, Freda K.
ba803747-c0ac-409f-a9c2-b61fde009f8c
Rice, Jason
d58d4fcd-8dc0-4599-bf96-62323d579227

Stevenson, Freda K. and Rice, Jason (2006) Commentary: Optimizing cancer immunotherapy trials: Back to basics. European Journal of Immunology, 36 (5), 1070-1073. (doi:10.1002/eji.200636085).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Attempts to raise effective immunity against cancer are benefiting from information on the nature of the immunity involved and its regulation and, perhaps, now it is time to step back and define our approach in molecular terms prior to clinical testing. Although there are immunological differences between mice and patients, results from murine studies are encouraging early 'translation' of concepts to the clinic and it is vital to take immunological principles emerging from mice into clinical vaccine design. One is the requirement to break tolerance against over-expressed self-antigens, a potentially risky procedure but necessary for several cancer targets. A study in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology attempts to do this by using xenogeneic antigens, albeit with variable outcome. The unstated goal is to activate T-cell help but this can be achieved more effectively by harnessing a predictable anti-microbial repertoire. The second issue lies in the delivery of antigen. One strategy is "prime/boost" using DNA priming and boosting with a viral vector; however, this induces blocking immunity against viral proteins, and must be used judiciously. There are other physical methods to increase immunity such as electroporation, which can itself be used in 'prime/boost' sequence.. These twin problems of engagement of T-cell help and delivery of adequate antigen can now be addressed by applying immunological logic to cancer vaccines.

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More information

Published date: May 2006
Keywords: vaccination, protein, outcome, vaccine, immunology, dna vaccines, epitope, cytotoxic t-cells, translation, cancer, dna, repertoire, t cells, immunotherapy, tumor-antigen, patient, responses, antigen, tumor immunology, cancer vaccines, electroporation, tolerance, time, immunity, t-cell, antigen processing and presentation, lymphocytes, trial

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 62933
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62933
ISSN: 0014-2980
PURE UUID: a1ffce32-0635-460e-b119-1200fe14251e
ORCID for Freda K. Stevenson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0933-5021

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Sep 2008
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:57

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