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Breast cancer is a promising target for vaccination using cancer-testis antigens known to elicit immune responses

Breast cancer is a promising target for vaccination using cancer-testis antigens known to elicit immune responses
Breast cancer is a promising target for vaccination using cancer-testis antigens known to elicit immune responses
Introduction Cancer-testis antigens ( CTAGs) are expressed solely in germ cells and in malignant tissues. They are targets of immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T cells in some cancers, and there is much interest in developing vaccines that induce these responses. The purpose of the present study was to ascertain the frequency of expression of CTAGs in breast cancer. Methods Breast tumours were collected sequentially in the Southampton Tumour Bank from donors who had given written informed consent. Stored samples where there was sufficient material were sampled in sequence. An initial series of 42 tumours was screened for expression of 17 different CTAGs. A second panel of 40 tumours was screened for the expression of those antigens present in the first panel. Results Ninety-three per cent of tumours in the first series expressed at least one CTAG, and 62% expressed the single antigen CTAG1. Eighty per cent of tumours in the second series expressed at least one CTAG, 50% expressing CTAG1. Tumours exhibiting higher risk features tended to express more CTAGs. Conclusion More than two- thirds of breast cancers would be covered by a vaccine directed against just three CTAGs CTAG1, BAGE1, and MAGEA10- all of which are known to be targets of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses.
breast cancer, breast, antigen, tissue, risk, gene, responses, t cells, expression, time, cells, breast-cancer, human-melanoma, tumors, cancer, tumours, vaccine, cytolytic t-lymphocytes, features, immune-responses, cell, ny-eso-1, t-cells
1465-5411
7pp
Taylor, Mark
9e06d135-016d-40e1-aea0-e6f5a2d345d6
Bolton, Louise M.
1ede0ff4-a8e4-4d42-ab2e-5f1f8de7fcbb
Johnson, Peter
3f6068ce-171e-4c2c-aca9-dc9b6a37413f
Elliott, Tim
16670fa8-c2f9-477a-91df-7c9e5b453e0e
Murray, Nick
0ab49492-4445-442a-a542-1d8d937a7fc2
Taylor, Mark
9e06d135-016d-40e1-aea0-e6f5a2d345d6
Bolton, Louise M.
1ede0ff4-a8e4-4d42-ab2e-5f1f8de7fcbb
Johnson, Peter
3f6068ce-171e-4c2c-aca9-dc9b6a37413f
Elliott, Tim
16670fa8-c2f9-477a-91df-7c9e5b453e0e
Murray, Nick
0ab49492-4445-442a-a542-1d8d937a7fc2

Taylor, Mark, Bolton, Louise M., Johnson, Peter, Elliott, Tim and Murray, Nick (2007) Breast cancer is a promising target for vaccination using cancer-testis antigens known to elicit immune responses Breast Cancer Research, 9, (4, R46), 7pp. (doi:10.1186/bcr1749). (PMID:17650306).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction Cancer-testis antigens ( CTAGs) are expressed solely in germ cells and in malignant tissues. They are targets of immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T cells in some cancers, and there is much interest in developing vaccines that induce these responses. The purpose of the present study was to ascertain the frequency of expression of CTAGs in breast cancer. Methods Breast tumours were collected sequentially in the Southampton Tumour Bank from donors who had given written informed consent. Stored samples where there was sufficient material were sampled in sequence. An initial series of 42 tumours was screened for expression of 17 different CTAGs. A second panel of 40 tumours was screened for the expression of those antigens present in the first panel. Results Ninety-three per cent of tumours in the first series expressed at least one CTAG, and 62% expressed the single antigen CTAG1. Eighty per cent of tumours in the second series expressed at least one CTAG, 50% expressing CTAG1. Tumours exhibiting higher risk features tended to express more CTAGs. Conclusion More than two- thirds of breast cancers would be covered by a vaccine directed against just three CTAGs CTAG1, BAGE1, and MAGEA10- all of which are known to be targets of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses.

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More information

Published date: 24 July 2007
Keywords: breast cancer, breast, antigen, tissue, risk, gene, responses, t cells, expression, time, cells, breast-cancer, human-melanoma, tumors, cancer, tumours, vaccine, cytolytic t-lymphocytes, features, immune-responses, cell, ny-eso-1, t-cells

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Local EPrints ID: 62951
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/62951
ISSN: 1465-5411
PURE UUID: 0ce45e63-7b7d-4152-b731-07075de5057a
ORCID for Peter Johnson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2306-4974
ORCID for Tim Elliott: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1097-0222

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2008
Last modified: 11 Jul 2017 09:46

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Author: Mark Taylor
Author: Louise M. Bolton
Author: Peter Johnson ORCID iD
Author: Tim Elliott ORCID iD
Author: Nick Murray

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