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The integration of fibre optics for atom chips

The integration of fibre optics for atom chips
The integration of fibre optics for atom chips
This thesis reports on the progress made towards the integration of fibre optics components for the atom chip, a device developed to manipulate matter on the atomic scale for the purpose of quantum information processing, novel applications, and fundamental research. Following in the direction of the electronics industry, miniaturisation has resulted in exquisite control of cold atoms above surfaces, allowing the vision of a matter wave toolbox to come closer to fruition. However, although the size of the components necessary for guiding atoms via magnetic or electrostatic fields has been greatly reduced, there is still a need to scale down the optical components. The development of these cavities is detailed in this thesis, from early use of evaporated gold coated mirrors to the fully integral solution of photorefractive Bragg gratings. In addition to a thorough analysis of the optical properties of these fibre gap cavities, experimental results indicate that these gap cavity devices can be constructed with the sensitivity necessary for single atom detection.
Helsby, Stephen John
78b5f242-c837-4959-9f58-13ebc99e020b
Helsby, Stephen John
78b5f242-c837-4959-9f58-13ebc99e020b
Kazansky, Peter
a5d123ec-8ea8-408c-8963-4a6d921fd76c

Helsby, Stephen John (2008) The integration of fibre optics for atom chips. University of Southampton, Optoelectronic Research Center, Doctoral Thesis, 97pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis reports on the progress made towards the integration of fibre optics components for the atom chip, a device developed to manipulate matter on the atomic scale for the purpose of quantum information processing, novel applications, and fundamental research. Following in the direction of the electronics industry, miniaturisation has resulted in exquisite control of cold atoms above surfaces, allowing the vision of a matter wave toolbox to come closer to fruition. However, although the size of the components necessary for guiding atoms via magnetic or electrostatic fields has been greatly reduced, there is still a need to scale down the optical components. The development of these cavities is detailed in this thesis, from early use of evaporated gold coated mirrors to the fully integral solution of photorefractive Bragg gratings. In addition to a thorough analysis of the optical properties of these fibre gap cavities, experimental results indicate that these gap cavity devices can be constructed with the sensitivity necessary for single atom detection.

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Published date: March 2008
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 63326
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/63326
PURE UUID: f8a56d55-002b-4990-bcea-77149cec734a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Oct 2008
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 14:18

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