The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

XUV diffraction from a self-assembled 2D array of hexagonal close-packed 200nm diameter PMMA spheres

XUV diffraction from a self-assembled 2D array of hexagonal close-packed 200nm diameter PMMA spheres
XUV diffraction from a self-assembled 2D array of hexagonal close-packed 200nm diameter PMMA spheres
Laser-generated XUV and soft x-ray radiation sources using high-harmonic generation, typically producing 108 photons per pulse per harmonic (~5 nm to ~50 nm) in a coherent low-divergence beam, are a promising source for nanometer scale imaging. Here we present XUV diffraction from a single-layer self-assembled hexagonal close-packed (HCP) array of 200 nm diameter PMMA nanospheres. Such a lattice is too small to diffract from using visible light, and hence XUV wavelengths are required. We observe a hexagonal diffraction pattern for three diffraction orders - the result of illuminating a single crystal. The observed interference peaks are a convolution of a Bragg peak with both the distribution of lattice planes (due to crystal defects) and the harmonic spectra. However, as these convolutions are in orthogonal directions, they can be independently resolved hence providing useful information on the quality of the crystal and the generated wavelengths. The far-field diffraction pattern from a single-layer HCP array of spheres is the Fourier Transform (FT) of a hexagonal grid of delta functions multiplied by the FT of the scattering function from a single sphere, which can be calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. We compare the measured intensity for each of the eighteen observed interference peaks for the harmonic at 27.6 nm, against the theoretical intensity. The excellent agreement over four orders of magnitude indicates that Mie scattering predicts an appropriate form factor for this analysis and also enables us to extract the complex refractive index of PMMA at this wavelength.
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Chau, C.F.
cebb4b2c-ed4f-4e79-8ab7-56fd05701ecb
Rogers, E.T.F.
b92cc8ab-0d91-4b2e-b5c7-8a2f490a36a2
Grant-Jacob, J.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Stebbings, S.L.
aa7b4db4-3297-485f-8caf-1c1c5951eae5
Praeger, M.
84575f28-4530-4f89-9355-9c5b6acc6cac
Froud, C.A.
516351fa-45f9-4566-aa2b-71776e7d5ede
Chapman, R.T.
8a9fe0e2-c408-4188-bf10-e93bf247205c
Butcher, T.J.
77bed03c-ae8f-4e12-8c35-974150a7cc2d
Hanna, D.C.
3da5a5b4-71c2-4441-bb67-21f0d28a187d
Baumberg, J.J.
78e1ea7e-8c70-404c-bf84-59aafe75cd07
Brocklesby, W.S.
c53ca2f6-db65-4e19-ad00-eebeb2e6de67
Frey, J.
ba60c559-c4af-44f1-87e6-ce69819bf23f
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Chau, C.F.
cebb4b2c-ed4f-4e79-8ab7-56fd05701ecb
Rogers, E.T.F.
b92cc8ab-0d91-4b2e-b5c7-8a2f490a36a2
Grant-Jacob, J.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Stebbings, S.L.
aa7b4db4-3297-485f-8caf-1c1c5951eae5
Praeger, M.
84575f28-4530-4f89-9355-9c5b6acc6cac
Froud, C.A.
516351fa-45f9-4566-aa2b-71776e7d5ede
Chapman, R.T.
8a9fe0e2-c408-4188-bf10-e93bf247205c
Butcher, T.J.
77bed03c-ae8f-4e12-8c35-974150a7cc2d
Hanna, D.C.
3da5a5b4-71c2-4441-bb67-21f0d28a187d
Baumberg, J.J.
78e1ea7e-8c70-404c-bf84-59aafe75cd07
Brocklesby, W.S.
c53ca2f6-db65-4e19-ad00-eebeb2e6de67
Frey, J.
ba60c559-c4af-44f1-87e6-ce69819bf23f

Mills, B., Chau, C.F., Rogers, E.T.F., Grant-Jacob, J., Stebbings, S.L., Praeger, M., Froud, C.A., Chapman, R.T., Butcher, T.J., Hanna, D.C., Baumberg, J.J., Brocklesby, W.S. and Frey, J. (2008) XUV diffraction from a self-assembled 2D array of hexagonal close-packed 200nm diameter PMMA spheres. Photon '08. 26 - 29 Aug 2008.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Laser-generated XUV and soft x-ray radiation sources using high-harmonic generation, typically producing 108 photons per pulse per harmonic (~5 nm to ~50 nm) in a coherent low-divergence beam, are a promising source for nanometer scale imaging. Here we present XUV diffraction from a single-layer self-assembled hexagonal close-packed (HCP) array of 200 nm diameter PMMA nanospheres. Such a lattice is too small to diffract from using visible light, and hence XUV wavelengths are required. We observe a hexagonal diffraction pattern for three diffraction orders - the result of illuminating a single crystal. The observed interference peaks are a convolution of a Bragg peak with both the distribution of lattice planes (due to crystal defects) and the harmonic spectra. However, as these convolutions are in orthogonal directions, they can be independently resolved hence providing useful information on the quality of the crystal and the generated wavelengths. The far-field diffraction pattern from a single-layer HCP array of spheres is the Fourier Transform (FT) of a hexagonal grid of delta functions multiplied by the FT of the scattering function from a single sphere, which can be calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. We compare the measured intensity for each of the eighteen observed interference peaks for the harmonic at 27.6 nm, against the theoretical intensity. The excellent agreement over four orders of magnitude indicates that Mie scattering predicts an appropriate form factor for this analysis and also enables us to extract the complex refractive index of PMMA at this wavelength.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: August 2008
Venue - Dates: Photon '08, 2008-08-26 - 2008-08-29
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre, Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 63353
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/63353
PURE UUID: bf2fae64-e58e-42a6-bef3-b4fea97e34a2
ORCID for B. Mills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1784-1012
ORCID for J. Grant-Jacob: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4270-4247
ORCID for W.S. Brocklesby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2123-6712
ORCID for J. Frey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0842-4302

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Oct 2008
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

Export record

Contributors

Author: B. Mills ORCID iD
Author: C.F. Chau
Author: E.T.F. Rogers
Author: J. Grant-Jacob ORCID iD
Author: S.L. Stebbings
Author: M. Praeger
Author: C.A. Froud
Author: R.T. Chapman
Author: T.J. Butcher
Author: D.C. Hanna
Author: J.J. Baumberg
Author: W.S. Brocklesby ORCID iD
Author: J. Frey ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×