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Dispersion of the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons trinitas) at the Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary, Navira swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.

Dispersion of the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons trinitas) at the Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary, Navira swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.
Dispersion of the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons trinitas) at the Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary, Navira swamp, Trinidad, West Indies.
Previous surveys in 1972, 1995, and 2003 of the two endemic species of primates in Trindad, Cebus albifrons trinitatis and Alouatta seniculus insulanus, have shown that anthropogenic activity, primarily habitat destruction and hunting, have reduced numbers to 8 and 30 (1995) and 31 and 34 (2003), respectively. Troops were confined to fragmented pockets of rainforest, leaving little opportunity for dispersal. Not all troops were located within areas protected by statute and the enforcement of legislation may be inadequate. In 2006 this pilot observational study of C. albifrons trinitatis was conducted in Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary (BBWS), where conservation measures are robustly supported by the government of Republic of Trindad and Tobago (RoTT). The aims were to conduct a population survey and assess methods for future longitudinal studies. Walked transects were conducted using GPS (Garmin GPSMap 76CSX) with continuous data recording under the BBWS canopy. This enabled visual and auditory data for study subjects and other features e.g. fruiting trees, to be recorded and plotted. Forty seven individuals were observed on 5 sampling days. The subject index of dispersion was calculated (x?=9.4, s2=124.32, IoD=13.23) and Chi-Square calculated from the index of dispersion multiplied by the degrees of freedom v (n–1=4), ?2=52.89, indicating a clumped dispersal. This combined with limited qualitative evidence gained indicates that, within BBWS, C. albifrons trinitatis numbers are at worst stable and at best increasing slightly. A GPS receiver will be used in subsequent research so that points, transect lines and clusters may be accurately recorded and revisited ensuring consistency throughout the study. The overall objective of the longitudinal study remains to rigorously assess the effectiveness of conservation measures and to determine whether additional steps are achievable and necessary to ensure the continued survival of free-ranging primates within Trinidad.
p.22
International Society for Applied Ethology
Budgen, Paul S.
a6effd9e-acb6-4473-98e9-b0543f278ae5
Goodwin, Deborah
6a44fe30-189a-493d-8dcc-3eb8199a12ab
Galindo, Francisco
Lorenzo, Alvarez
Budgen, Paul S.
a6effd9e-acb6-4473-98e9-b0543f278ae5
Goodwin, Deborah
6a44fe30-189a-493d-8dcc-3eb8199a12ab
Galindo, Francisco
Lorenzo, Alvarez

Budgen, Paul S. and Goodwin, Deborah (2007) Dispersion of the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons trinitas) at the Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary, Navira swamp, Trinidad, West Indies. Galindo, Francisco and Lorenzo, Alvarez (eds.) In Proceedings of the 41st International Congress of the ISAE, Merida, Mexico. International Society for Applied Ethology. p.22 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Previous surveys in 1972, 1995, and 2003 of the two endemic species of primates in Trindad, Cebus albifrons trinitatis and Alouatta seniculus insulanus, have shown that anthropogenic activity, primarily habitat destruction and hunting, have reduced numbers to 8 and 30 (1995) and 31 and 34 (2003), respectively. Troops were confined to fragmented pockets of rainforest, leaving little opportunity for dispersal. Not all troops were located within areas protected by statute and the enforcement of legislation may be inadequate. In 2006 this pilot observational study of C. albifrons trinitatis was conducted in Bush Bush Wildlife Sanctuary (BBWS), where conservation measures are robustly supported by the government of Republic of Trindad and Tobago (RoTT). The aims were to conduct a population survey and assess methods for future longitudinal studies. Walked transects were conducted using GPS (Garmin GPSMap 76CSX) with continuous data recording under the BBWS canopy. This enabled visual and auditory data for study subjects and other features e.g. fruiting trees, to be recorded and plotted. Forty seven individuals were observed on 5 sampling days. The subject index of dispersion was calculated (x?=9.4, s2=124.32, IoD=13.23) and Chi-Square calculated from the index of dispersion multiplied by the degrees of freedom v (n–1=4), ?2=52.89, indicating a clumped dispersal. This combined with limited qualitative evidence gained indicates that, within BBWS, C. albifrons trinitatis numbers are at worst stable and at best increasing slightly. A GPS receiver will be used in subsequent research so that points, transect lines and clusters may be accurately recorded and revisited ensuring consistency throughout the study. The overall objective of the longitudinal study remains to rigorously assess the effectiveness of conservation measures and to determine whether additional steps are achievable and necessary to ensure the continued survival of free-ranging primates within Trinidad.

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More information

Published date: 31 July 2007
Venue - Dates: 41st International Congress of the ISAE, 2007-07-30 - 2007-08-03

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 63488
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/63488
PURE UUID: 32ad0389-ee7d-4290-8dfd-2270d60725bb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Oct 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:24

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