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Thresholds for the perception of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration by seated persons

Thresholds for the perception of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration by seated persons
Thresholds for the perception of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration by seated persons
Vibration experienced in transport and in buildings can yield discomfort or annoyance if the vibration exceeds the threshold for vibration perception. Knowledge of thresholds makes it possible to determine which frequencies and directions of low magnitude vibration give rise to perception. The effect vibration frequency (2 to 315 Hz) on absolute thresholds for the perception of whole-body vibration has been determined experimentally with 12 seated persons for each of the three axes of excitation (fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical). The frequency-dependence of the thresholds differed between the three axes. At frequencies, greater than 10 Hz, sensitivity was greatest for vertical vibration. At frequencies less than 3.15 Hz, sensitivity was greatest to fore-and-aft vibration. In all three axes, the acceleration threshold contours at frequencies greater than 80 Hz were U-shaped, suggesting the same psychophysical channel mediated high frequency thresholds for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration. It is shown that the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of whole-body vibration are not consistent with the frequency weightings used in current standards.
4323-4327
Morioka, M.
8eb26aca-8773-4e45-8737-61c2438d30d9
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Morioka, M.
8eb26aca-8773-4e45-8737-61c2438d30d9
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Morioka, M. and Griffin, M.J. (2008) Thresholds for the perception of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration by seated persons. Acoustics'08, France. 29 Jun - 04 Jul 2008. pp. 4323-4327 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Vibration experienced in transport and in buildings can yield discomfort or annoyance if the vibration exceeds the threshold for vibration perception. Knowledge of thresholds makes it possible to determine which frequencies and directions of low magnitude vibration give rise to perception. The effect vibration frequency (2 to 315 Hz) on absolute thresholds for the perception of whole-body vibration has been determined experimentally with 12 seated persons for each of the three axes of excitation (fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical). The frequency-dependence of the thresholds differed between the three axes. At frequencies, greater than 10 Hz, sensitivity was greatest for vertical vibration. At frequencies less than 3.15 Hz, sensitivity was greatest to fore-and-aft vibration. In all three axes, the acceleration threshold contours at frequencies greater than 80 Hz were U-shaped, suggesting the same psychophysical channel mediated high frequency thresholds for fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical vibration. It is shown that the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of whole-body vibration are not consistent with the frequency weightings used in current standards.

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Published date: July 2008
Additional Information: Abstract no. 2213
Venue - Dates: Acoustics'08, France, 2008-06-29 - 2008-07-04
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 63652
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/63652
PURE UUID: 273e59f5-30d7-482b-bbdd-736d997f6b8a
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Oct 2008
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:27

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