The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Size–frequency dynamics of NE Pacific abyssal ophiuroids (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)

Size–frequency dynamics of NE Pacific abyssal ophiuroids (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)
Size–frequency dynamics of NE Pacific abyssal ophiuroids (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)
The 17-year time-series study at Station M in the NE Pacific has provided one of the longest datasets on deep-sea ophiuroids to date. Station M is an abyssal site characterized by low topographical relief and seasonal and interannual variation in surface-derived food inputs. From 1989 to 2005, over 31,000 ophiuroid specimens were collected. Size–frequency distributions of the four dominant species, Ophiura bathybia, Amphilepis patens, Amphiura carchara and Ophiacantha cosmica, were examined for recruitment and the role of surface-derived food supplies on body size distributions. Juveniles were collected in sediment traps and used to investigate settlement patterns and seasonality. Trawl samples showed no indication of seasonal changes in recruitment to larger size classes; however, there was evidence of seasonal settling of juveniles. Interannual differences in median disk diameters and size distributions of trawl-collected adults are greater than those at the seasonal scale. Three of the four species, O. bathybia, A. patens and O. cosmica, had co-varying monthly median disk diameters, suggesting they may have a similar factor(s) controlling their growth and abundance. Interannual differences in monthly size distributions were generally greater than those between seasons. Cross-correlations between the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux (food supply) and size distribution indices for O. bathybia, A. patens and O. cosmica all were significant indicating that increases in food supply were followed by increases in the proportion of smaller size classes after approximately 17–22 months. These findings suggest that food inputs are indeed an important factor influencing deep-sea ophiuroid populations on interannual time scales, more generally supporting the long-hypothesized connection between food availability and population size structure in the deep sea.
0025-3162
933-941
Booth, J. Ashley T.
8c91c9fc-7498-42b4-90b7-fb6a131cddf9
Ruhl, Henry A.
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Lovell, Lawrence L.
1bde818e-346d-4570-b9a4-cec183ae67e4
Bailey, David M.
6888df28-2844-45f7-97c6-c4fa3cd745ab
Smith, Kenneth L.
c282f721-59cf-4caa-a344-f4a26f6b534c
Booth, J. Ashley T.
8c91c9fc-7498-42b4-90b7-fb6a131cddf9
Ruhl, Henry A.
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Lovell, Lawrence L.
1bde818e-346d-4570-b9a4-cec183ae67e4
Bailey, David M.
6888df28-2844-45f7-97c6-c4fa3cd745ab
Smith, Kenneth L.
c282f721-59cf-4caa-a344-f4a26f6b534c

Booth, J. Ashley T., Ruhl, Henry A., Lovell, Lawrence L., Bailey, David M. and Smith, Kenneth L. (2008) Size–frequency dynamics of NE Pacific abyssal ophiuroids (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea). Marine Biology, 154 (6), 933-941. (doi:10.1007/s00227-008-0982-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The 17-year time-series study at Station M in the NE Pacific has provided one of the longest datasets on deep-sea ophiuroids to date. Station M is an abyssal site characterized by low topographical relief and seasonal and interannual variation in surface-derived food inputs. From 1989 to 2005, over 31,000 ophiuroid specimens were collected. Size–frequency distributions of the four dominant species, Ophiura bathybia, Amphilepis patens, Amphiura carchara and Ophiacantha cosmica, were examined for recruitment and the role of surface-derived food supplies on body size distributions. Juveniles were collected in sediment traps and used to investigate settlement patterns and seasonality. Trawl samples showed no indication of seasonal changes in recruitment to larger size classes; however, there was evidence of seasonal settling of juveniles. Interannual differences in median disk diameters and size distributions of trawl-collected adults are greater than those at the seasonal scale. Three of the four species, O. bathybia, A. patens and O. cosmica, had co-varying monthly median disk diameters, suggesting they may have a similar factor(s) controlling their growth and abundance. Interannual differences in monthly size distributions were generally greater than those between seasons. Cross-correlations between the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux (food supply) and size distribution indices for O. bathybia, A. patens and O. cosmica all were significant indicating that increases in food supply were followed by increases in the proportion of smaller size classes after approximately 17–22 months. These findings suggest that food inputs are indeed an important factor influencing deep-sea ophiuroid populations on interannual time scales, more generally supporting the long-hypothesized connection between food availability and population size structure in the deep sea.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 30 April 2008

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 63917
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/63917
ISSN: 0025-3162
PURE UUID: 50b98748-1337-4311-801c-4ff2388d7504

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×