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High altitude electrical power generation

High altitude electrical power generation
High altitude electrical power generation
This paper investigates the technical feasibility of a system that could be used to collect the solar irradiation at high altitude, convert it into electricity, and then transmit it to the ground via a cable. As a first step to assess the viability of this device, an estimate of the solar irradiation that can be expected at a defined altitude above the ground is presented, based on real atmospheric data. The study demonstrates that locating PV devices at high altitude with the use of an aerostatic platform, could bring a significant advantage in the production of electrical power, if compared with a typical UK ground based PV system. The fundamental equations for a preliminary design of the system are presented together with a first realistic choice of the most relevant engineering parameters that need to be set. An estimate of the cost of the system is provided and the possible risks involved, applications, advantages and disadvantages of the technology are assessed.
solar energy, aerostat, photovoltaic, flying electrical generators, energy conversion, solar radiation
1790-5079
1067-1077
Aglietti, Guglielmo S.
e44d0dd4-0f71-4399-93d2-b802365cfb9e
Redi, Stefano
0405ec91-5634-43cd-b483-39e19d0b81b5
Tatnall, Adrian R.
2c9224b6-4faa-4bfd-9026-84e37fa6bdf3
Markvart, Thomas
f21e82ec-4e3b-4485-9f27-ffc0102fdf1c
Aglietti, Guglielmo S.
e44d0dd4-0f71-4399-93d2-b802365cfb9e
Redi, Stefano
0405ec91-5634-43cd-b483-39e19d0b81b5
Tatnall, Adrian R.
2c9224b6-4faa-4bfd-9026-84e37fa6bdf3
Markvart, Thomas
f21e82ec-4e3b-4485-9f27-ffc0102fdf1c

Aglietti, Guglielmo S., Redi, Stefano, Tatnall, Adrian R. and Markvart, Thomas (2008) High altitude electrical power generation. WSEAS Transactions on Environment and Development, 4 (12), 1067-1077.

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper investigates the technical feasibility of a system that could be used to collect the solar irradiation at high altitude, convert it into electricity, and then transmit it to the ground via a cable. As a first step to assess the viability of this device, an estimate of the solar irradiation that can be expected at a defined altitude above the ground is presented, based on real atmospheric data. The study demonstrates that locating PV devices at high altitude with the use of an aerostatic platform, could bring a significant advantage in the production of electrical power, if compared with a typical UK ground based PV system. The fundamental equations for a preliminary design of the system are presented together with a first realistic choice of the most relevant engineering parameters that need to be set. An estimate of the cost of the system is provided and the possible risks involved, applications, advantages and disadvantages of the technology are assessed.

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More information

Published date: December 2008
Keywords: solar energy, aerostat, photovoltaic, flying electrical generators, energy conversion, solar radiation
Organisations: Astronautics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 64993
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/64993
ISSN: 1790-5079
PURE UUID: c11c3f90-35bc-4673-a041-91642b8fb511

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2009
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:20

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