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Growth and reproduction in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Adacnarca nitens (Philobryidae) from the Ross Sea

Growth and reproduction in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Adacnarca nitens (Philobryidae) from the Ross Sea
Growth and reproduction in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Adacnarca nitens (Philobryidae) from the Ross Sea
We present information on the reproductive biology, population structure, and growth of the brooding Antarctic bivalve Adacnarca nitens Pelseneer 1903, from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Individuals ranging from 0.85 - 6.00 mm were found attached to a hydrozoan colony. This species shows low fecundity and large egg size, common to other brooding species. The minimum size at which oogenesis was detected was 2.3 mm and the minimum size at which brooding was evident was 3.9 mm. Embryos of a full range of developmental stages were brooded simultaneously in females. The population showed a log-normal distribution and results suggest non-periodic reproduction with continuous embryonic development. The reproductive traits of A. nitens are discussed in the context of circum-Antarctic species distribution and limitations to dispersal in brooding benthic invertebrates.
0025-3162
1073-1081
Higgs, Nicholas
193ad3e2-32cb-43ee-ac7b-35173b1cd1a9
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Hooke, Rachel
cc642707-77fe-4240-939b-f27af3aa8f99
Honey, David
913475d4-9851-47d4-ba57-5ce957d861fb
Heilmayer, Olaf
fbdf6076-4104-418a-bbe7-f344e046ff25
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Higgs, Nicholas
193ad3e2-32cb-43ee-ac7b-35173b1cd1a9
Reed, Adam
ec734ee2-469c-4259-91d6-4abcfbe65e3b
Hooke, Rachel
cc642707-77fe-4240-939b-f27af3aa8f99
Honey, David
913475d4-9851-47d4-ba57-5ce957d861fb
Heilmayer, Olaf
fbdf6076-4104-418a-bbe7-f344e046ff25
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533

Higgs, Nicholas, Reed, Adam, Hooke, Rachel, Honey, David, Heilmayer, Olaf and Thatje, Sven (2009) Growth and reproduction in the Antarctic brooding bivalve Adacnarca nitens (Philobryidae) from the Ross Sea. Marine Biology, 156 (5), 1073-1081. (doi:10.1007/s00227-009-1154-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We present information on the reproductive biology, population structure, and growth of the brooding Antarctic bivalve Adacnarca nitens Pelseneer 1903, from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Individuals ranging from 0.85 - 6.00 mm were found attached to a hydrozoan colony. This species shows low fecundity and large egg size, common to other brooding species. The minimum size at which oogenesis was detected was 2.3 mm and the minimum size at which brooding was evident was 3.9 mm. Embryos of a full range of developmental stages were brooded simultaneously in females. The population showed a log-normal distribution and results suggest non-periodic reproduction with continuous embryonic development. The reproductive traits of A. nitens are discussed in the context of circum-Antarctic species distribution and limitations to dispersal in brooding benthic invertebrates.

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Published date: April 2009
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 65006
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/65006
ISSN: 0025-3162
PURE UUID: d733789c-c4f5-414b-b32a-802f72f0cf0f
ORCID for Adam Reed: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2200-5067

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jan 2009
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:12

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