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Case-control study of low-back pain referred for magnetic resonance imaging, with special focus on whole-body vibration

Case-control study of low-back pain referred for magnetic resonance imaging, with special focus on whole-body vibration
Case-control study of low-back pain referred for magnetic resonance imaging, with special focus on whole-body vibration
Objectives This study investigated risk factors for low-back pain among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with special focus on whole-body vibration.

Methods A case–control approach was used. The study population comprised working-aged persons from a catchment area for radiology services. The cases were those in a consecutive series referred for a lumbar MRI because of low-back pain. The controls were age- and gender-matched persons X-rayed for other reasons. Altogether, 252 cases and 820 controls were studied, including 185 professional drivers. The participants were questioned about physical factors loading the spine, psychosocial factors, driving, personal characteristics, mental health, and certain beliefs about low-back pain. Exposure to whole-body vibration was assessed by six measures, including weekly duration of professional driving, hours driven in one period, and current root mean square A(8). Associations with whole-body vibration were examined with adjustment for age, gender, and other potential confounders.

Results Strong associations were found with poor mental health and belief in work as a causal factor for low-back pain, and with occupational sitting for ?3 hours while not driving. Associations were also found for taller stature, consulting propensity, body mass index, smoking history, fear–avoidance beliefs, frequent twisting, low decision latitude, and low support at work. However, the associations with the six metrics of whole-body vibration were weak and not statistically significant, and no exposure–response relationships were found.

Conclusions Little evidence of a risk from professional driving or whole-body vibration was found. Drivers were substantially less heavily exposed to whole-body vibration than in some earlier surveys. Nonetheless, it seems that, at the population level, whole-body vibration is not an important cause of low-back pain among those referred for MRI.
0355-3140
364-373
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Harris, E.C.
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Bennett, J.
597dc7ed-0dfd-4b22-a670-b05549d5c08d
Reading, I.
6f832276-87b7-4a76-a9ed-b4b3df0a3f66
Sampson, M.
9a7da298-adbf-4de4-acd0-aeaebc99ea6f
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Harris, E.C.
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Bennett, J.
597dc7ed-0dfd-4b22-a670-b05549d5c08d
Reading, I.
6f832276-87b7-4a76-a9ed-b4b3df0a3f66
Sampson, M.
9a7da298-adbf-4de4-acd0-aeaebc99ea6f
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Palmer, K.T., Harris, E.C., Griffin, M.J., Bennett, J., Reading, I., Sampson, M. and Coggon, D. (2008) Case-control study of low-back pain referred for magnetic resonance imaging, with special focus on whole-body vibration. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 34 (5), 364-373.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives This study investigated risk factors for low-back pain among patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with special focus on whole-body vibration.

Methods A case–control approach was used. The study population comprised working-aged persons from a catchment area for radiology services. The cases were those in a consecutive series referred for a lumbar MRI because of low-back pain. The controls were age- and gender-matched persons X-rayed for other reasons. Altogether, 252 cases and 820 controls were studied, including 185 professional drivers. The participants were questioned about physical factors loading the spine, psychosocial factors, driving, personal characteristics, mental health, and certain beliefs about low-back pain. Exposure to whole-body vibration was assessed by six measures, including weekly duration of professional driving, hours driven in one period, and current root mean square A(8). Associations with whole-body vibration were examined with adjustment for age, gender, and other potential confounders.

Results Strong associations were found with poor mental health and belief in work as a causal factor for low-back pain, and with occupational sitting for ?3 hours while not driving. Associations were also found for taller stature, consulting propensity, body mass index, smoking history, fear–avoidance beliefs, frequent twisting, low decision latitude, and low support at work. However, the associations with the six metrics of whole-body vibration were weak and not statistically significant, and no exposure–response relationships were found.

Conclusions Little evidence of a risk from professional driving or whole-body vibration was found. Drivers were substantially less heavily exposed to whole-body vibration than in some earlier surveys. Nonetheless, it seems that, at the population level, whole-body vibration is not an important cause of low-back pain among those referred for MRI.

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Published date: 2008
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 65379
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/65379
ISSN: 0355-3140
PURE UUID: 54f4dff4-cc08-4bcb-ad44-cce6ef544583
ORCID for E.C. Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8037-566X
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502
ORCID for I. Reading: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1457-6532
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

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Date deposited: 13 Feb 2009
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:27

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Contributors

Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: E.C. Harris ORCID iD
Author: M.J. Griffin ORCID iD
Author: J. Bennett
Author: I. Reading ORCID iD
Author: M. Sampson
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

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