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Photonic band gap fibres: the new way of guiding light

Photonic band gap fibres: the new way of guiding light
Photonic band gap fibres: the new way of guiding light
Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs) are a radically new class of optical fibres whose guiding properties rely on the existence of photonic bandgaps. These fibres can guide light within an air-core thanks to a periodic array of micrometer-size holes running along the fibre length [1], see Fig 1a,b. PBGF have opened up numerous possibilities in photonics, largely through their ability to overcome the limitations of conventional optical fibres, for example by permitting guidance of light at wavelengths where silica fibres present high loss. They offer great prospects for communications due to the potential for low loss that results from the light being guided in air. In addition, these features make them ideal for sensors since there can be a large overlap between the light and gases, liquids, or nanoparticles introduced into the central hole. Such fibres could then be used wherever high sensitivity detectors are needed such as in the bio-medical field, or even for homeland security applications.
Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo
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Broderick, N.G.
b85a5bab-7c7a-4db8-aede-01ccef7b5b36
Petrovich, M.N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Richardson, D.J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3
Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo
df6ba319-ccab-43d7-a8bb-cb064649a3cd
Broderick, N.G.
b85a5bab-7c7a-4db8-aede-01ccef7b5b36
Petrovich, M.N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Richardson, D.J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3

Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo, Broderick, N.G., Petrovich, M.N. and Richardson, D.J. (2006) Photonic band gap fibres: the new way of guiding light. Annual Parliamentary Reception and Competition for Britain's Younger Engineers. 12 Dec 2006. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs) are a radically new class of optical fibres whose guiding properties rely on the existence of photonic bandgaps. These fibres can guide light within an air-core thanks to a periodic array of micrometer-size holes running along the fibre length [1], see Fig 1a,b. PBGF have opened up numerous possibilities in photonics, largely through their ability to overcome the limitations of conventional optical fibres, for example by permitting guidance of light at wavelengths where silica fibres present high loss. They offer great prospects for communications due to the potential for low loss that results from the light being guided in air. In addition, these features make them ideal for sensors since there can be a large overlap between the light and gases, liquids, or nanoparticles introduced into the central hole. Such fibres could then be used wherever high sensitivity detectors are needed such as in the bio-medical field, or even for homeland security applications.

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Published date: 12 December 2006
Venue - Dates: Annual Parliamentary Reception and Competition for Britain's Younger Engineers, 2006-12-12 - 2006-12-12

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 65760
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/65760
PURE UUID: 0fea2f9d-9f78-456b-ac4c-9e57641f60cb
ORCID for M.N. Petrovich: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3905-5901
ORCID for D.J. Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7751-1058

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Mar 2009
Last modified: 06 Mar 2019 01:37

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Contributors

Author: Rodrigo Amezcua-Correa
Author: N.G. Broderick
Author: M.N. Petrovich ORCID iD
Author: D.J. Richardson ORCID iD

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