Two sides to self-protection: self-improvement strivings and feedback from close relationships eliminate mnemic neglect


Green, Jeffrey D., Sedikides, Constantine, Pinter, Brad and Van Tongeren, Daryl R. (2009) Two sides to self-protection: self-improvement strivings and feedback from close relationships eliminate mnemic neglect Self and Identity, 8, (2-3), pp. 233-250. (doi:10.1080/15298860802505145).

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Description/Abstract

People selectively forget feedback that threatens central self-conceptions, a phenomenon labeled mnemic neglect. Such forgetting serves to protect the self-system, but its rigid application may be associated with liabilities such as failing to learn about one's weaknesses. Two experiments tested the extent to which mnemic neglect is rigid or flexible. In Experiment 1, where self-improvement strivings were primed, mnemic neglect was absent: threatening and non-threatening feedback was recalled equally. In Experiment 2, participants received feedback either from a stranger or a close relationship. Participants recalled poorly threatening stranger feedback but recalled well threatening close-relationship feedback.

Self-protection is flexible and strategic. Individuals recall well self-threatening feedback when they are concerned with self-improvement and when the feedback has ramifications for long-term relationships.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1080/15298860802505145
ISSNs: 1529-8868 (print)
Related URLs:
Keywords: close relationship, mnemic, self-enhancement, self-improvement, self-protection
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
ePrint ID: 66019
Date :
Date Event
April 2009Published
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2010
Last Modified: 18 Apr 2017 21:45
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/66019

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