The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Characterisation of the sea surface microlayer - using Langmuir films and ellipsometry

Characterisation of the sea surface microlayer - using Langmuir films and ellipsometry
Characterisation of the sea surface microlayer - using Langmuir films and ellipsometry
The sea-surface microlayer (SSM) is a hugely complex system comprised of many different organic materials that has a considerable influence on the physical and chemical properties of the ocean surface. Under certain conditions, involving wind, internal waves and currents, the SSM is compressed and forms biogenic slicks. These biogenic slicks have a wave dampening effect and when using satellite data to monitor the ocean surfaces look indistinguishable from anthropogenic slicks. It is important to understand the physical properties of these biogenic slicks to identify oil pollution. For this project the physical properties of biogenic slicks from the Solent (UK) and the Black Sea (Ukraine) are being investigated. Model compounds that display similar properties to the slicks are also being characterized; these simpler systems are easier to interpret and parallels to the biogenic slicks can be made increasing understanding. The tools used to characterize these Langmuir films involve the analysis of the phase and amplitude change of polarized light upon surface reflection (ellipsometry). The film can be compressed and expanded monitoring changes in surface pressure. In conjunction, ellipsometry can be used to determine optical properties, thickness, phase changes and hysteresis effects of the film, offering both spectroscopic information and images. The changes of the film on compression are important as they mimic natural events that have the potential to be of use in satellite data interpretation. Results show, in images, the domain separation of different chemical species within the SSM and co-existence of phases. Upon compression and expansion of the films, aggregation of the different phases along with hysteresis effects are seen – phenomena that has only been hypothesized so far. Work on the model compounds demonstrates that it is possible to determine thicknesses of thin films at different surface pressures offering valuable information on phase changes.
King, Wendy
797f9b12-795a-4782-8b06-6f6b2a5f6cb3
Greef, Robert
91063544-ed89-4738-b5f4-28a984bf5866
Byfield, Valborg
b360ba2c-2648-4f94-9b22-536423ef65c1
Ermakov, Stanislav
ec8a4486-7f49-4041-b332-9679f75e0e0f
Frey, Jeremy G.
ba60c559-c4af-44f1-87e6-ce69819bf23f
King, Wendy
797f9b12-795a-4782-8b06-6f6b2a5f6cb3
Greef, Robert
91063544-ed89-4738-b5f4-28a984bf5866
Byfield, Valborg
b360ba2c-2648-4f94-9b22-536423ef65c1
Ermakov, Stanislav
ec8a4486-7f49-4041-b332-9679f75e0e0f
Frey, Jeremy G.
ba60c559-c4af-44f1-87e6-ce69819bf23f

King, Wendy, Greef, Robert, Byfield, Valborg, Ermakov, Stanislav and Frey, Jeremy G. (2009) Characterisation of the sea surface microlayer - using Langmuir films and ellipsometry. Canadian Meterological and Oceanographic Society 2009 Congress, Halifax, Canada. 30 May - 04 Jun 2009. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

The sea-surface microlayer (SSM) is a hugely complex system comprised of many different organic materials that has a considerable influence on the physical and chemical properties of the ocean surface. Under certain conditions, involving wind, internal waves and currents, the SSM is compressed and forms biogenic slicks. These biogenic slicks have a wave dampening effect and when using satellite data to monitor the ocean surfaces look indistinguishable from anthropogenic slicks. It is important to understand the physical properties of these biogenic slicks to identify oil pollution. For this project the physical properties of biogenic slicks from the Solent (UK) and the Black Sea (Ukraine) are being investigated. Model compounds that display similar properties to the slicks are also being characterized; these simpler systems are easier to interpret and parallels to the biogenic slicks can be made increasing understanding. The tools used to characterize these Langmuir films involve the analysis of the phase and amplitude change of polarized light upon surface reflection (ellipsometry). The film can be compressed and expanded monitoring changes in surface pressure. In conjunction, ellipsometry can be used to determine optical properties, thickness, phase changes and hysteresis effects of the film, offering both spectroscopic information and images. The changes of the film on compression are important as they mimic natural events that have the potential to be of use in satellite data interpretation. Results show, in images, the domain separation of different chemical species within the SSM and co-existence of phases. Upon compression and expansion of the films, aggregation of the different phases along with hysteresis effects are seen – phenomena that has only been hypothesized so far. Work on the model compounds demonstrates that it is possible to determine thicknesses of thin films at different surface pressures offering valuable information on phase changes.

Slideshow
Poster_for_CMOS_conference.ppt - Other
Download (7MB)

More information

Published date: 13 May 2009
Venue - Dates: Canadian Meterological and Oceanographic Society 2009 Congress, Halifax, Canada, 2009-05-30 - 2009-06-04

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 66222
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/66222
PURE UUID: 0c448938-b826-46e3-a938-893857fed936
ORCID for Jeremy G. Frey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0842-4302

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2009
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 01:24

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×