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A compact computational method for predicting forces on a rudder in a propeller slipstream

A compact computational method for predicting forces on a rudder in a propeller slipstream
A compact computational method for predicting forces on a rudder in a propeller slipstream
A modified lifting line theory is presented which models ship rudder load characteristics when operating downstream of a propeller. The effects of the propeller upstream are modelled using blade element-momentum theory and are incorporated in the lifting line analysis as changes in the spanwise input velocity and incidence distributions.

An outline of the theoretical analysis is given, together with detailed comparisons with experimental data. It is demonstrated that satisfactory predictions of the form of the spanwise loadings for different propeller thrust loadings and rudder-propellor separations can be made. The theoretical model provides a very useful design tool and examples are presented of parametric studies which use the theory to investigate variations in rudder and propeller particulars. The theoretical method is sufficiently rapid and compact that it should be suitable for incorporation directly within a manoeuvring simulation model.

lifting line, blade element momentum, ship manoeurving, rudder-propeller interaction
0035-8967
227-244
Molland, A.F.
917272d0-ada8-4b1b-8191-1611875ef9ca
Turnock, S.R.
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Molland, A.F.
917272d0-ada8-4b1b-8191-1611875ef9ca
Turnock, S.R.
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce

Molland, A.F. and Turnock, S.R. (1996) A compact computational method for predicting forces on a rudder in a propeller slipstream. Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects, 138, 227-244.

Record type: Article

Abstract

A modified lifting line theory is presented which models ship rudder load characteristics when operating downstream of a propeller. The effects of the propeller upstream are modelled using blade element-momentum theory and are incorporated in the lifting line analysis as changes in the spanwise input velocity and incidence distributions.

An outline of the theoretical analysis is given, together with detailed comparisons with experimental data. It is demonstrated that satisfactory predictions of the form of the spanwise loadings for different propeller thrust loadings and rudder-propellor separations can be made. The theoretical model provides a very useful design tool and examples are presented of parametric studies which use the theory to investigate variations in rudder and propeller particulars. The theoretical method is sufficiently rapid and compact that it should be suitable for incorporation directly within a manoeuvring simulation model.

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More information

Published date: 1996
Keywords: lifting line, blade element momentum, ship manoeurving, rudder-propeller interaction
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 66475
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/66475
ISSN: 0035-8967
PURE UUID: e2c9a94e-052c-4e10-b4b3-4f3960b79975
ORCID for S.R. Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jun 2009
Last modified: 06 Oct 2018 00:40

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