The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Dysfunctional turning in Parkinson’s disease

Dysfunctional turning in Parkinson’s disease
Dysfunctional turning in Parkinson’s disease
Purpose. People with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently freeze or fall turning: They turn slowly taking numerous steps. We aimed to describe more fully the differences observed on turning between people with and without PD, in particular the extent of left-right asymmetry and the correlations between turning and age, balance and PD severity, using a simple clinical test.

Method. Twenty-eight people with PD (median age 71; median years since diagnosis eight) and 12 controls (median age 70) performed the video-based Standing Start 180° Turn Test. We counted turning steps (n), evaluated turn time (sec), type and quality (0 – 5, based on independence, ground clearance, stability, continuity and posture) and calculated the 95% limits of left-right agreement.

Results. The groups differed (p < 0.004) on step count (medians 4.5 vs. 3), time (2.3 sec vs. 1.7 sec) and quality (4 vs. 5). In the PD group, 75% turned ‘on-the-spot’ and differences turning left and right were marked (e.g., 95% upper limit for step count 6.6). Among controls, 42% turned ‘on-the-spot’ and turning was symmetrical (e.g., 95% upper limit for step count 1.7). Step count was most closely correlated with self-assessed disability in PD (r = 0.67; p = 0.001) and with age among controls (r = 0.87; p = 0.001).

Conclusions. People having difficulty turning are likely to have trouble with many everyday activities and thus may benefit from rehabilitation. Directional asymmetry in turning is easily identifiable and future studies should explore its diagnostic value


Parkinson’s disease, turning, gait analysis
0963-8288
1222-1229
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991

Stack, E. and Ashburn, A. (2008) Dysfunctional turning in Parkinson’s disease. Disability and Rehabilitation, 30 (16), 1222-1229. (doi:10.1080/09638280701829938). (PMID:18608364)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose. People with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently freeze or fall turning: They turn slowly taking numerous steps. We aimed to describe more fully the differences observed on turning between people with and without PD, in particular the extent of left-right asymmetry and the correlations between turning and age, balance and PD severity, using a simple clinical test.

Method. Twenty-eight people with PD (median age 71; median years since diagnosis eight) and 12 controls (median age 70) performed the video-based Standing Start 180° Turn Test. We counted turning steps (n), evaluated turn time (sec), type and quality (0 – 5, based on independence, ground clearance, stability, continuity and posture) and calculated the 95% limits of left-right agreement.

Results. The groups differed (p < 0.004) on step count (medians 4.5 vs. 3), time (2.3 sec vs. 1.7 sec) and quality (4 vs. 5). In the PD group, 75% turned ‘on-the-spot’ and differences turning left and right were marked (e.g., 95% upper limit for step count 6.6). Among controls, 42% turned ‘on-the-spot’ and turning was symmetrical (e.g., 95% upper limit for step count 1.7). Step count was most closely correlated with self-assessed disability in PD (r = 0.67; p = 0.001) and with age among controls (r = 0.87; p = 0.001).

Conclusions. People having difficulty turning are likely to have trouble with many everyday activities and thus may benefit from rehabilitation. Directional asymmetry in turning is easily identifiable and future studies should explore its diagnostic value


Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, turning, gait analysis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 67127
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/67127
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: 65375b3f-6e84-4b16-aed8-3287b57617b9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Aug 2009
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: E. Stack
Author: A. Ashburn

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×