The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Impaired mobility and Parkinson’s disease

Impaired mobility and Parkinson’s disease
Impaired mobility and Parkinson’s disease
Impaired mobility associated with frequent falls is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is the focus of three related papers in this issue. Walking quietly forward, in a straight line across a smooth surface presents people with PD with a basic challenge but when the mobility task is in any way more complex, the level of challenge rises steeply for people with PD.

Ashburn et al.'s diary-based survey of over 600 falls suggests that only a handful of activities account for the majority of falls among people with PD, with ‘tripping while walking’ taking first place and ‘falling while turning’ being associated with serious injury. Jones et al.'s qualitative study explores how the distressing uncertainty that one can walk safely from A to B without falling is detrimental to self-esteem and participation in society. In this paper, like that of Ashburn et al., the authors discuss how any kind of ‘multi-tasking’ exacerbates the risk of falling. Stack et al.'s paper describes an analysis of turning to walk from a standing start, an activity that most healthy adults accomplish readily, and discusses why people with PD find turning so notoriously challenging. All three papers address methodological issues around the assessment of mobility, falls and fallers and the authors make innovative suggestions about rehabilitation practice. Together, this survey, interview set and movement analysis add to the existing knowledge base on falls and illuminate difficulties specific to PD. The combination of research methods is successfully drawing researchers to what patients consider the key issues, optimizing the immediate relevance of the research output


0963-8288
1204
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Stack, Emma
0e1f47cc-4530-4ebe-aa72-21cffd207108
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Stack, Emma
0e1f47cc-4530-4ebe-aa72-21cffd207108

Ashburn, A. and Stack, Emma (2008) Impaired mobility and Parkinson’s disease. Disability and Rehabilitation, 30 (16), 1204. (doi:10.1080/09638280701828898). (PMID:18791912)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Impaired mobility associated with frequent falls is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is the focus of three related papers in this issue. Walking quietly forward, in a straight line across a smooth surface presents people with PD with a basic challenge but when the mobility task is in any way more complex, the level of challenge rises steeply for people with PD.

Ashburn et al.'s diary-based survey of over 600 falls suggests that only a handful of activities account for the majority of falls among people with PD, with ‘tripping while walking’ taking first place and ‘falling while turning’ being associated with serious injury. Jones et al.'s qualitative study explores how the distressing uncertainty that one can walk safely from A to B without falling is detrimental to self-esteem and participation in society. In this paper, like that of Ashburn et al., the authors discuss how any kind of ‘multi-tasking’ exacerbates the risk of falling. Stack et al.'s paper describes an analysis of turning to walk from a standing start, an activity that most healthy adults accomplish readily, and discusses why people with PD find turning so notoriously challenging. All three papers address methodological issues around the assessment of mobility, falls and fallers and the authors make innovative suggestions about rehabilitation practice. Together, this survey, interview set and movement analysis add to the existing knowledge base on falls and illuminate difficulties specific to PD. The combination of research methods is successfully drawing researchers to what patients consider the key issues, optimizing the immediate relevance of the research output


Text
Impaired_mobility__Parkinson's_disease_(2).pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 2008
Additional Information: Introduction to the special section
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 67128
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/67128
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: 4f4b884c-5669-4b56-adc5-0e66515779f0

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Aug 2009
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 23:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: A. Ashburn
Author: Emma Stack

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×