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Functional nucleic acids as substrate for information processing

Functional nucleic acids as substrate for information processing
Functional nucleic acids as substrate for information processing
Information processing applications driven by self-assembly and conformation dynamics of nucleic acids are possible. These underlying paradigms (self-assembly and conformation dynamics) are essential for natural information processors as illustrated by proteins. A key advantage in utilising nucleic acids as information processors is the availability of computational tools to support the design process. This provides us with a platform to develop an integrated environment in which an orchestration of molecular building blocks can be realised. Strict arbitrary control over the design of these computational nucleic acids is not feasible. The microphysical behaviour of these molecular materials must be taken into consideration during the design phase. This thesis investigated, to what extent the construction of molecular building blocks for a particular purpose is possible with the support of a software environment. In this work we developed a computational protocol that functions on a multi-molecular level, which enable us to directly incorporate the dynamic characteristics of nucleic acids molecules. To allow the implementation of this computational protocol, we developed a designer that able to solve the nucleic acids inverse prediction problem, not only in the multi-stable states level, but also include the interactions among molecules that occur in each meta-stable state. The realisation of our computational protocol are evaluated by generating computational nucleic acids units that resembles synthetic RNA devices that have been successfully implemented in the laboratory. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of the protocol to design various types of computational units. The accuracy and diversity of the generated candidates are significantly better than the best candidates produced by conventional designers. With the computational protocol, the design of nucleic acid information processor using a network of interconnecting nucleic acids is now feasible.
Ramlan, Effirul I.
74dbdb29-5071-4b5c-87a1-b511e7b17383
Ramlan, Effirul I.
74dbdb29-5071-4b5c-87a1-b511e7b17383
Zauner, Klaus-Peter
c8b22dbd-10e6-43d8-813b-0766f985cc97

Ramlan, Effirul I. (2009) Functional nucleic acids as substrate for information processing. University of Southampton, School of Electronics and Computer Science, Doctoral Thesis, 187pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Information processing applications driven by self-assembly and conformation dynamics of nucleic acids are possible. These underlying paradigms (self-assembly and conformation dynamics) are essential for natural information processors as illustrated by proteins. A key advantage in utilising nucleic acids as information processors is the availability of computational tools to support the design process. This provides us with a platform to develop an integrated environment in which an orchestration of molecular building blocks can be realised. Strict arbitrary control over the design of these computational nucleic acids is not feasible. The microphysical behaviour of these molecular materials must be taken into consideration during the design phase. This thesis investigated, to what extent the construction of molecular building blocks for a particular purpose is possible with the support of a software environment. In this work we developed a computational protocol that functions on a multi-molecular level, which enable us to directly incorporate the dynamic characteristics of nucleic acids molecules. To allow the implementation of this computational protocol, we developed a designer that able to solve the nucleic acids inverse prediction problem, not only in the multi-stable states level, but also include the interactions among molecules that occur in each meta-stable state. The realisation of our computational protocol are evaluated by generating computational nucleic acids units that resembles synthetic RNA devices that have been successfully implemented in the laboratory. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of the protocol to design various types of computational units. The accuracy and diversity of the generated candidates are significantly better than the best candidates produced by conventional designers. With the computational protocol, the design of nucleic acid information processor using a network of interconnecting nucleic acids is now feasible.

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Published date: June 2009
Organisations: University of Southampton

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Local EPrints ID: 67322
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/67322
PURE UUID: 7bb7ac47-81b4-4296-83bd-093d44a3fdaa

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Date deposited: 27 Aug 2009
Last modified: 29 Jan 2020 12:56

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