The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The clinical effectiveness of static resting splints in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial

The clinical effectiveness of static resting splints in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial
The clinical effectiveness of static resting splints in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial
Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of static resting splints in early RA. Methods. A multicentre, randomized, trial was conducted. Patients (n = 120) received either static resting splints [positioned with the wrist in neutral, MCP joint (MCPJ) and IP joint (IPJ) in a maximum of 60 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion, respectively] plus standardized occupational therapy or standardized occupational therapy alone. Change in grip strength (Ns), structural impairment (MCPJ ulnar deviation), applied dexterity (Button Board), self-report hand ability [Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ)], hand pain and morning hand stiffness were assessed at 0 and 12 months.

Results. Data for 56 (97%) splinted and 60 (97%) control group patients were analysed. Splint wear adherence was moderate; 24.5% 'never wore' the splints. The adjusted mean difference between groups for handgrip was -14.2 Ns (P = 0.342; 95% CI -43.7, 5.4); MCPJ ulnar deviation-1.1 degrees (P = 0.657; 95% CI =-6.2, 3.9); dexterity 0.1 s (P = 0.975; 95% CI =-6.6, 6.8) and self-report ability -3.0 on the MHQ score (P = 0.426; 95% CI -10.5, 4.5). Pain scores were unchanged in either group (P = 0.15). The occurrence of morning hand stiffness was reduced in a small group of splinted patients (P = 0.021), but the duration shortened in control patients (P = 0.010).

Conclusions. There was no significant difference between the two interventions on grip strength, deformity, hand function and pain. The data favoured the control group and this study suggests that resting splints should not be used as a routine treatment of patients with early RA
rheumatoid arthritis, human, outcomes, static splint, rheumatoid-arthritis, occupational-therapy, predictors, disease, hand, therapy, methods, england, follow-up, pain, disability, hand function, trial, occupational therapy
1462-0324
1548-1553
Adams, J.
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Burridge, J.
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Mullee, M.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Hammond, A.
434bfb65-20d4-411d-b650-973a8366b8b2
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Adams, J.
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Burridge, J.
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Mullee, M.
fd3f91c3-5e95-4f56-8d73-260824eeb362
Hammond, A.
434bfb65-20d4-411d-b650-973a8366b8b2
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Adams, J., Burridge, J., Mullee, M., Hammond, A. and Cooper, C. (2008) The clinical effectiveness of static resting splints in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Rheumatology, 47 (10), 1548-1553. (PMID:18701540)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of static resting splints in early RA. Methods. A multicentre, randomized, trial was conducted. Patients (n = 120) received either static resting splints [positioned with the wrist in neutral, MCP joint (MCPJ) and IP joint (IPJ) in a maximum of 60 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion, respectively] plus standardized occupational therapy or standardized occupational therapy alone. Change in grip strength (Ns), structural impairment (MCPJ ulnar deviation), applied dexterity (Button Board), self-report hand ability [Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ)], hand pain and morning hand stiffness were assessed at 0 and 12 months.

Results. Data for 56 (97%) splinted and 60 (97%) control group patients were analysed. Splint wear adherence was moderate; 24.5% 'never wore' the splints. The adjusted mean difference between groups for handgrip was -14.2 Ns (P = 0.342; 95% CI -43.7, 5.4); MCPJ ulnar deviation-1.1 degrees (P = 0.657; 95% CI =-6.2, 3.9); dexterity 0.1 s (P = 0.975; 95% CI =-6.6, 6.8) and self-report ability -3.0 on the MHQ score (P = 0.426; 95% CI -10.5, 4.5). Pain scores were unchanged in either group (P = 0.15). The occurrence of morning hand stiffness was reduced in a small group of splinted patients (P = 0.021), but the duration shortened in control patients (P = 0.010).

Conclusions. There was no significant difference between the two interventions on grip strength, deformity, hand function and pain. The data favoured the control group and this study suggests that resting splints should not be used as a routine treatment of patients with early RA

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: October 2008
Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, human, outcomes, static splint, rheumatoid-arthritis, occupational-therapy, predictors, disease, hand, therapy, methods, england, follow-up, pain, disability, hand function, trial, occupational therapy
Organisations: Dev Origins of Health & Disease, Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 67680
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/67680
ISSN: 1462-0324
PURE UUID: f777226f-34d9-453b-9ba3-9eaa3e334f37
ORCID for J. Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2009
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:59

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×