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The association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adreanal-axis activity and blood pressure in an Afro-Caribbean population

The association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adreanal-axis activity and blood pressure in an Afro-Caribbean population
The association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adreanal-axis activity and blood pressure in an Afro-Caribbean population
Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic—pituitary—adrenal axi (HPAA) resulting fromfetal programming may play a role in the development of high blood pressure (BP) in black people. We assessed the diurnal salivary cortisol profile in children with andwithout increased BPand evaluated their mother’s HPAA. In a cross-sectional study, 20Afro-Caribbean children (mean age 9.6 years) with higher blood pressures and 20 children with lower blood pressures were chosen from a prospective study of 569 mothers and children in Jamaica. Daytime salivary cortisol profiles were collected in the children and their mothers. The mothers were also assessed for features of themetabolic syndrome. Children with higher BP had higher mean morning salivary cortisol concentrations than those with lower BP (7.9 S.D. 1.9 vs. 4.5 S.D. 2.4 nmol/l; p = 0.03). Their mothers also had increased morning salivary cortisol concentrations (9.9 S.D. 1.8 vs. 5.5 S.D. 2.5 nmol/l; p = 0.02), but no changes in fasting glucose, insulin, lipids, BP or adiposity. Maternal and offspring cortisol concentrations correlated significantly (r = 0.465, p = 0.004). Maternal cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with the child’s BP.We conclude that Afro-Caribbean childrenwith higher BP have higher morning salivary cortisol concentrations. The children’s cortisol concentrations correlate significantly with the mother’s cortisol concentrations. These findings suggest that the HPAA may play a role in the development of raised BP in Afro-Caribbean people.
Cortisol, blood pressure, fetus, birth weight, Jamaica
0306-4530
736-742
Boyne, Michael S.
7d787822-30fc-42e4-b3d4-8d3df98dfabd
Woollard, Alexander
735354f8-63a4-48c1-905e-bb088440e36a
Phillips, David I.W.
29b73be7-2ff9-4fff-ae42-d59842df4cc6
Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn
a79552ce-930b-470c-b253-8cc152b30987
Bennett, Franklyn I.
749d6b69-bc4f-4a84-98b1-1cfcb4c9dfe6
Osmond, Clive
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Thomas, Tamika Y. Royal
0017cb2e-c04b-4f00-8876-bfabe8a046fa
Wilks, Rainford J.
482ee1f5-160f-4a1c-b300-5dcbf323085b
Forrester, Terrence E.
d5ed0294-0713-4521-baf9-923f1cae5e7f
Boyne, Michael S.
7d787822-30fc-42e4-b3d4-8d3df98dfabd
Woollard, Alexander
735354f8-63a4-48c1-905e-bb088440e36a
Phillips, David I.W.
29b73be7-2ff9-4fff-ae42-d59842df4cc6
Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn
a79552ce-930b-470c-b253-8cc152b30987
Bennett, Franklyn I.
749d6b69-bc4f-4a84-98b1-1cfcb4c9dfe6
Osmond, Clive
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Thomas, Tamika Y. Royal
0017cb2e-c04b-4f00-8876-bfabe8a046fa
Wilks, Rainford J.
482ee1f5-160f-4a1c-b300-5dcbf323085b
Forrester, Terrence E.
d5ed0294-0713-4521-baf9-923f1cae5e7f

Boyne, Michael S., Woollard, Alexander, Phillips, David I.W., Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn, Bennett, Franklyn I., Osmond, Clive, Thomas, Tamika Y. Royal, Wilks, Rainford J. and Forrester, Terrence E. (2009) The association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adreanal-axis activity and blood pressure in an Afro-Caribbean population. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 34 (5), 736-742. (doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2008.12.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic—pituitary—adrenal axi (HPAA) resulting fromfetal programming may play a role in the development of high blood pressure (BP) in black people. We assessed the diurnal salivary cortisol profile in children with andwithout increased BPand evaluated their mother’s HPAA. In a cross-sectional study, 20Afro-Caribbean children (mean age 9.6 years) with higher blood pressures and 20 children with lower blood pressures were chosen from a prospective study of 569 mothers and children in Jamaica. Daytime salivary cortisol profiles were collected in the children and their mothers. The mothers were also assessed for features of themetabolic syndrome. Children with higher BP had higher mean morning salivary cortisol concentrations than those with lower BP (7.9 S.D. 1.9 vs. 4.5 S.D. 2.4 nmol/l; p = 0.03). Their mothers also had increased morning salivary cortisol concentrations (9.9 S.D. 1.8 vs. 5.5 S.D. 2.5 nmol/l; p = 0.02), but no changes in fasting glucose, insulin, lipids, BP or adiposity. Maternal and offspring cortisol concentrations correlated significantly (r = 0.465, p = 0.004). Maternal cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with the child’s BP.We conclude that Afro-Caribbean childrenwith higher BP have higher morning salivary cortisol concentrations. The children’s cortisol concentrations correlate significantly with the mother’s cortisol concentrations. These findings suggest that the HPAA may play a role in the development of raised BP in Afro-Caribbean people.

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Published date: June 2009
Keywords: Cortisol, blood pressure, fetus, birth weight, Jamaica

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 68986
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/68986
ISSN: 0306-4530
PURE UUID: 4e9f6aea-6b76-4fd0-bce9-4f42e2314379
ORCID for Clive Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655

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Date deposited: 13 Oct 2009
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:18

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Contributors

Author: Michael S. Boyne
Author: Alexander Woollard
Author: David I.W. Phillips
Author: Carolyn Taylor-Bryan
Author: Franklyn I. Bennett
Author: Clive Osmond ORCID iD
Author: Tamika Y. Royal Thomas
Author: Rainford J. Wilks
Author: Terrence E. Forrester

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