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Extreme physical inactivity differentially alters dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking

Extreme physical inactivity differentially alters dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking
Extreme physical inactivity differentially alters dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking
OBJECTIVE: obesity and diabetes are characterized by the incapacity to use fat as fuel. We hypothesized that this reduced fat oxidation is secondary to a sedentary lifestyle.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: we investigated the effect of a 2-month bed rest on the dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking in lean women (control group, n = 8) and the effect of concomitant resistance/aerobic exercise training as a countermeasure (exercise group, n = 8). Trafficking of stable isotope-labeled dietary fats was combined with muscle gene expression and magnetic resonance imaging-derived muscle fat content analyses.
RESULTS: in the control group, bed rest increased the cumulative [1-(13)C]oleate and [d(31)]palmitate appearance in triglycerides (37%, P = 0.009, and 34%, P = 0.016, respectively) and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) (37%, P = 0.038, and 38%, P = 0.002) and decreased muscle lipoprotein lipase (P = 0.043) and fatty acid translocase CD36 (P = 0.043) mRNA expressions. Plasma NEFA-to-triglyceride ratios for [1-(13)C]oleate and [d(31)]palmitate remained unchanged, suggesting that the same proportion of tracers enters the peripheral tissues after bed rest. Bed rest did not affect [1-(13)C]oleate oxidation but decreased [d(31)]palmitate oxidation by -8.2 +/- 4.9% (P < 0.0001). Despite a decreased spontaneous energy intake and a reduction of 1.9 +/- 0.3 kg (P = 0.001) in fat mass, exercise training did not mitigate these alterations but partially maintained fat-free mass, insulin sensitivity, and total lipid oxidation in fasting and fed states. In both groups, muscle fat content increased by 2.7% after bed rest and negatively correlated with the reduction in [d(31)]palmitate oxidation (r(2) = 0.48, P = 0.003).
CONCLUSIONS: while saturated and monounsaturated fats have similar plasma trafficking and clearance, physical inactivity affects the partitioning of saturated fats toward storage, likely leading to an accumulation of palmitate in muscle fat.
0012-1797
367-376
Bergouignan, Audrey
fe2b1e22-0a36-4309-898c-4ff9ef2e8dec
Trudel, Guy
b2b7989e-86e9-4792-97c8-6e211c7a7b4c
Simon, Chantal
076d5ca8-0eeb-4fc7-a554-009207840d13
Chopard, Angèle
814fda67-6cdc-4f48-b787-ddda6b9190b3
Schoeller, Dale A.
d1633a7d-c247-4c7e-a5b9-2af89d25a3e9
Momken, Iman
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Votruba, Susanne B.
2e05e09b-a35d-4cf6-8a61-93a6cf1d56db
Desage, Michel
5b84051e-043e-4550-9533-ac4da84ed188
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette
b8f54339-4a9f-4e58-b893-5b7894b64947
Normand, Sylvie
7254c979-f704-43d6-b8ab-f53947feea9e
Blanc, Stéphane
d59fbb5b-d802-4ceb-a650-e9ad875bd8ef
Bergouignan, Audrey
fe2b1e22-0a36-4309-898c-4ff9ef2e8dec
Trudel, Guy
b2b7989e-86e9-4792-97c8-6e211c7a7b4c
Simon, Chantal
076d5ca8-0eeb-4fc7-a554-009207840d13
Chopard, Angèle
814fda67-6cdc-4f48-b787-ddda6b9190b3
Schoeller, Dale A.
d1633a7d-c247-4c7e-a5b9-2af89d25a3e9
Momken, Iman
2d91909d-1ef3-4370-a22e-6428e7045403
Votruba, Susanne B.
2e05e09b-a35d-4cf6-8a61-93a6cf1d56db
Desage, Michel
5b84051e-043e-4550-9533-ac4da84ed188
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette
b8f54339-4a9f-4e58-b893-5b7894b64947
Normand, Sylvie
7254c979-f704-43d6-b8ab-f53947feea9e
Blanc, Stéphane
d59fbb5b-d802-4ceb-a650-e9ad875bd8ef

Bergouignan, Audrey, Trudel, Guy, Simon, Chantal, Chopard, Angèle, Schoeller, Dale A., Momken, Iman, Votruba, Susanne B., Desage, Michel, Burdge, Graham C., Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette, Normand, Sylvie and Blanc, Stéphane (2009) Extreme physical inactivity differentially alters dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking. Diabetes, 58 (2), 367-376. (doi:10.2337/db08-0263).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: obesity and diabetes are characterized by the incapacity to use fat as fuel. We hypothesized that this reduced fat oxidation is secondary to a sedentary lifestyle.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: we investigated the effect of a 2-month bed rest on the dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking in lean women (control group, n = 8) and the effect of concomitant resistance/aerobic exercise training as a countermeasure (exercise group, n = 8). Trafficking of stable isotope-labeled dietary fats was combined with muscle gene expression and magnetic resonance imaging-derived muscle fat content analyses.
RESULTS: in the control group, bed rest increased the cumulative [1-(13)C]oleate and [d(31)]palmitate appearance in triglycerides (37%, P = 0.009, and 34%, P = 0.016, respectively) and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) (37%, P = 0.038, and 38%, P = 0.002) and decreased muscle lipoprotein lipase (P = 0.043) and fatty acid translocase CD36 (P = 0.043) mRNA expressions. Plasma NEFA-to-triglyceride ratios for [1-(13)C]oleate and [d(31)]palmitate remained unchanged, suggesting that the same proportion of tracers enters the peripheral tissues after bed rest. Bed rest did not affect [1-(13)C]oleate oxidation but decreased [d(31)]palmitate oxidation by -8.2 +/- 4.9% (P < 0.0001). Despite a decreased spontaneous energy intake and a reduction of 1.9 +/- 0.3 kg (P = 0.001) in fat mass, exercise training did not mitigate these alterations but partially maintained fat-free mass, insulin sensitivity, and total lipid oxidation in fasting and fed states. In both groups, muscle fat content increased by 2.7% after bed rest and negatively correlated with the reduction in [d(31)]palmitate oxidation (r(2) = 0.48, P = 0.003).
CONCLUSIONS: while saturated and monounsaturated fats have similar plasma trafficking and clearance, physical inactivity affects the partitioning of saturated fats toward storage, likely leading to an accumulation of palmitate in muscle fat.

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Published date: February 2009
Organisations: Dev Origins of Health & Disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69046
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69046
ISSN: 0012-1797
PURE UUID: 45cf9e8a-cfaa-4a48-8be2-aec85383280d
ORCID for Graham C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

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Date deposited: 15 Oct 2009
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 02:08

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Contributors

Author: Audrey Bergouignan
Author: Guy Trudel
Author: Chantal Simon
Author: Angèle Chopard
Author: Dale A. Schoeller
Author: Iman Momken
Author: Susanne B. Votruba
Author: Michel Desage
Author: Guillemette Gauquelin-Koch
Author: Sylvie Normand
Author: Stéphane Blanc

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