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Accessing elite nurses for research: reflections on the theoretical and practical issues of telephone interviewing.

Accessing elite nurses for research: reflections on the theoretical and practical issues of telephone interviewing.
Accessing elite nurses for research: reflections on the theoretical and practical issues of telephone interviewing.
Elite groups are interesting as they frequently are powerful (in terms of position, knowledge and influence) and enjoy considerable authority. It is important, therefore, to involve them in research concerned with understanding social contexts and processes. This is particularly pertinent in healthcare, where considerable strategic development and change are features of everyday practice that may be guided or perceived as being guided, by elites.
This paper evolved from a study investigating the availability and role of nurses whose remit involved leading nursing research and development within acute NHS Trusts in two health regions in Southern England. The study design included telephone interviews with Directors of Nursing Services during which time the researchers engaged in a reflective analysis of their experiences of conducting research with an `elite' group. Important issues identified were the role of gatekeepers, engagement with elites and the use of the telephone interview method in this context. The paper examines these issues and makes a case for involving executive nurses in further research. The paper also offers strategies to help researchers design and implement telephone interview studies successfully to maximise access to the views and experiences of `hard to reach groups', such as elites, while minimising the associated disruption
elite populations, telephone interviewing, gate-keeping, nurse executives
236-248
Harris, Ruth
1e848808-be89-4f63-a62b-41ec65b8c82f
Kelly, Daniel
10b0a4eb-fd29-4110-81da-92700153149e
Plant, Hilary
f3aafaf2-a3c0-483d-8eee-6d6271f11aaa
Hunt, Jane A.
f625df47-4a15-41b2-baef-a460be92ac33
Kelley, Kate
4463a15a-e6a0-4d7c-97c0-41190fea25ba
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Sitzia, John
7aa099da-5f90-4e28-878d-c3041d6b33ca
Harris, Ruth
1e848808-be89-4f63-a62b-41ec65b8c82f
Kelly, Daniel
10b0a4eb-fd29-4110-81da-92700153149e
Plant, Hilary
f3aafaf2-a3c0-483d-8eee-6d6271f11aaa
Hunt, Jane A.
f625df47-4a15-41b2-baef-a460be92ac33
Kelley, Kate
4463a15a-e6a0-4d7c-97c0-41190fea25ba
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Sitzia, John
7aa099da-5f90-4e28-878d-c3041d6b33ca

Harris, Ruth, Kelly, Daniel, Plant, Hilary, Hunt, Jane A., Kelley, Kate, Richardson, Alison and Sitzia, John (2008) Accessing elite nurses for research: reflections on the theoretical and practical issues of telephone interviewing. Journal of Research in Nursing, 13 (3), 236-248. (doi:10.1177/1744987107084671).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Elite groups are interesting as they frequently are powerful (in terms of position, knowledge and influence) and enjoy considerable authority. It is important, therefore, to involve them in research concerned with understanding social contexts and processes. This is particularly pertinent in healthcare, where considerable strategic development and change are features of everyday practice that may be guided or perceived as being guided, by elites.
This paper evolved from a study investigating the availability and role of nurses whose remit involved leading nursing research and development within acute NHS Trusts in two health regions in Southern England. The study design included telephone interviews with Directors of Nursing Services during which time the researchers engaged in a reflective analysis of their experiences of conducting research with an `elite' group. Important issues identified were the role of gatekeepers, engagement with elites and the use of the telephone interview method in this context. The paper examines these issues and makes a case for involving executive nurses in further research. The paper also offers strategies to help researchers design and implement telephone interview studies successfully to maximise access to the views and experiences of `hard to reach groups', such as elites, while minimising the associated disruption

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More information

Published date: May 2008
Keywords: elite populations, telephone interviewing, gate-keeping, nurse executives

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69134
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69134
PURE UUID: 3f7f1ba1-4baf-4897-bd58-6f34d32e57ce
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Nov 2009
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:42

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