The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Methodological issues when using the draw and write technique with children aged 6-12 years

Methodological issues when using the draw and write technique with children aged 6-12 years
Methodological issues when using the draw and write technique with children aged 6-12 years
Researchers are responsible for using techniques that allow children to contribute their perspectives in a way that is most suited to their strengths and preferences. The draw and write technique is a method that needs to be used carefully and sensitively if children are to become active participants in revealing their world as they see it. In this article, we explore the issues for the child and researcher of using the draw and write technique as a participatory research methodology. Reflections on the technique are drawn from our experience of using it with children aged 6 to 12 years. This was part of a larger study undertaken to enable children aged 4 to 18 years with a diagnosis of cancer to give their views about hospital care. The participating children's verbal and artistic contributions illustrate how children are able to convey their opinions when there is an enabling climate created
art, cancer, children, participatory research, psychological issues, relationships
1049-7323
1001-1011
Horstman, Marie
36ee19d8-8d52-46d3-af64-83ea02e0e0af
Aldiss, Susie
1731ec9b-2fbb-4cbb-929c-a2eaadf0243b
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Gibson, Faith
b537d483-3f20-4f15-a9b8-880758746728
Horstman, Marie
36ee19d8-8d52-46d3-af64-83ea02e0e0af
Aldiss, Susie
1731ec9b-2fbb-4cbb-929c-a2eaadf0243b
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Gibson, Faith
b537d483-3f20-4f15-a9b8-880758746728

Horstman, Marie, Aldiss, Susie, Richardson, Alison and Gibson, Faith (2008) Methodological issues when using the draw and write technique with children aged 6-12 years. Qualitative Health Research, 18 (7), 1001-1011. (doi:10.1177/1049732308318230).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Researchers are responsible for using techniques that allow children to contribute their perspectives in a way that is most suited to their strengths and preferences. The draw and write technique is a method that needs to be used carefully and sensitively if children are to become active participants in revealing their world as they see it. In this article, we explore the issues for the child and researcher of using the draw and write technique as a participatory research methodology. Reflections on the technique are drawn from our experience of using it with children aged 6 to 12 years. This was part of a larger study undertaken to enable children aged 4 to 18 years with a diagnosis of cancer to give their views about hospital care. The participating children's verbal and artistic contributions illustrate how children are able to convey their opinions when there is an enabling climate created

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: July 2008
Keywords: art, cancer, children, participatory research, psychological issues, relationships

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69135
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69135
ISSN: 1049-7323
PURE UUID: dec00fdf-04d9-42a2-a7dd-d80f24376d3b
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Nov 2009
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:40

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×