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Exploring the work of nurses who administer chemotherapy

Exploring the work of nurses who administer chemotherapy
Exploring the work of nurses who administer chemotherapy
There is little research exploring nurses' experiences of, and attitudes towards, the chemotherapy administration process. There is also limited work investigating practitioners' educational preparation for this aspect of cancer nursing. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences, attitudes and educational preparation for the chemotherapy administration process. A postal survey was conducted across 26 London hospitals providing cancer services. A survey questionnaire was sent to all 526 nurses who administered chemotherapy in these hospitals, of whom 257 replied (response rate 49%). Nearly all nurses (n=244, 95%) reported being frightened, scared and anxious when initially working with chemotherapy. Of these 221(86%) stated they became more confident with experience, when supported by knowledgeable role models and following chemotherapy education. Over 80% (n=206) of the sample had received some form of education, whilst 241 nurses (94%) thought they could benefit from more. Nurses reported they were often or always worried about extravasation (n=113, 44%), anaphylactic reactions (n=95, 37%), and other nurses' education and knowledge deficits (n=118, 46%). Overall, nurses' attitudes towards chemotherapy were neither negative nor positive. Findings highlight the value of formal educational preparation in chemotherapy prior to undertaking this aspect of nursing. Positive role models for novice practitioners would appear important and role models themselves require continued professional development. Wide variations in educational preparation and practice exist and a co-ordinated education and training strategy for chemotherapy practice is warranted to underpin safe and effective practice in this area
cytotoxic, oncology nurses, chemotherapy, education, attitudes, support and concerns
1462-3889
244-252
Verity, Rebecca
609e0605-b494-4c15-8e26-7172a022f09d
Wiseman, Theresa
6863fcf4-9789-48ef-8532-783a5222c6ad
Ream, Emma
cac5aaf5-797c-4aff-b86f-ea717ac178fa
Teasdale, Emma
b8c380a0-22b0-408b-9ec8-25fadedf477d
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Verity, Rebecca
609e0605-b494-4c15-8e26-7172a022f09d
Wiseman, Theresa
6863fcf4-9789-48ef-8532-783a5222c6ad
Ream, Emma
cac5aaf5-797c-4aff-b86f-ea717ac178fa
Teasdale, Emma
b8c380a0-22b0-408b-9ec8-25fadedf477d
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7

Verity, Rebecca, Wiseman, Theresa, Ream, Emma, Teasdale, Emma and Richardson, Alison (2008) Exploring the work of nurses who administer chemotherapy. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 12 (3), 244-252. (doi:10.1016/j.ejon.2008.02.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is little research exploring nurses' experiences of, and attitudes towards, the chemotherapy administration process. There is also limited work investigating practitioners' educational preparation for this aspect of cancer nursing. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences, attitudes and educational preparation for the chemotherapy administration process. A postal survey was conducted across 26 London hospitals providing cancer services. A survey questionnaire was sent to all 526 nurses who administered chemotherapy in these hospitals, of whom 257 replied (response rate 49%). Nearly all nurses (n=244, 95%) reported being frightened, scared and anxious when initially working with chemotherapy. Of these 221(86%) stated they became more confident with experience, when supported by knowledgeable role models and following chemotherapy education. Over 80% (n=206) of the sample had received some form of education, whilst 241 nurses (94%) thought they could benefit from more. Nurses reported they were often or always worried about extravasation (n=113, 44%), anaphylactic reactions (n=95, 37%), and other nurses' education and knowledge deficits (n=118, 46%). Overall, nurses' attitudes towards chemotherapy were neither negative nor positive. Findings highlight the value of formal educational preparation in chemotherapy prior to undertaking this aspect of nursing. Positive role models for novice practitioners would appear important and role models themselves require continued professional development. Wide variations in educational preparation and practice exist and a co-ordinated education and training strategy for chemotherapy practice is warranted to underpin safe and effective practice in this area

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More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: cytotoxic, oncology nurses, chemotherapy, education, attitudes, support and concerns

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69374
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69374
ISSN: 1462-3889
PURE UUID: 674455e5-6b8f-4527-9fd0-779c44a69fbc
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755

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Date deposited: 11 Nov 2009
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:42

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Verity
Author: Theresa Wiseman
Author: Emma Ream
Author: Emma Teasdale

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