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An investigation of the quality of breast cancer information provided on the internet by voluntary organisations in Great Britain

An investigation of the quality of breast cancer information provided on the internet by voluntary organisations in Great Britain
An investigation of the quality of breast cancer information provided on the internet by voluntary organisations in Great Britain
Objective: patients increasingly use the internet to source health information. Voluntary organisations offering information and support often provide such information on their websites. However, the internet is unregulated and information can be of poor quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of breast cancer information provided by 10 Great Britain (GB) voluntary organisations’ websites.
Methods: quality of websites was evaluated using an investigator-designed appraisal tool based on European Commission (EC) quality criteria for health-related websites. Completeness and transparency of breast cancer information, and usability of websites, were appraised.
Results: typically, breast cancer-specific organisations provided the highest quality information, particularly in terms of its completeness. However, great variability in quality was identified. Areas of weakness related to transparency of information, in particular disclosure of authorship, and its apparent currency.
Conclusion: voluntary organisations providing web-based breast cancer information have progress to make to ensure information provided is complete and transparent, and websites are user-friendly. Unfortunately, informed decision-making will not be optimised if patients cannot access quality information.
Practice implications: voluntary organisations should regularly review the quality of information on their websites. Grading of websites allows healthcare professionals to identify and signpost patients to trustworthy, up-to-date websites. Thus, ensuring patients receive high quality information
breast cancer, internet, quality, evaluation
0738-3991
10-15
Ream, Emma
cac5aaf5-797c-4aff-b86f-ea717ac178fa
Blows, Emma
dfdfe3a7-5653-4ff2-a9ff-e1dd5f2fb993
Scanlon, Karen
674d120b-27e1-4d09-90d3-ef7f97a6f9b5
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7
Ream, Emma
cac5aaf5-797c-4aff-b86f-ea717ac178fa
Blows, Emma
dfdfe3a7-5653-4ff2-a9ff-e1dd5f2fb993
Scanlon, Karen
674d120b-27e1-4d09-90d3-ef7f97a6f9b5
Richardson, Alison
3db30680-aa47-43a5-b54d-62d10ece17b7

Ream, Emma, Blows, Emma, Scanlon, Karen and Richardson, Alison (2009) An investigation of the quality of breast cancer information provided on the internet by voluntary organisations in Great Britain. Patient Education and Counseling, 76 (1), 10-15. (doi:10.1016/j.pec.2008.11.019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: patients increasingly use the internet to source health information. Voluntary organisations offering information and support often provide such information on their websites. However, the internet is unregulated and information can be of poor quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of breast cancer information provided by 10 Great Britain (GB) voluntary organisations’ websites.
Methods: quality of websites was evaluated using an investigator-designed appraisal tool based on European Commission (EC) quality criteria for health-related websites. Completeness and transparency of breast cancer information, and usability of websites, were appraised.
Results: typically, breast cancer-specific organisations provided the highest quality information, particularly in terms of its completeness. However, great variability in quality was identified. Areas of weakness related to transparency of information, in particular disclosure of authorship, and its apparent currency.
Conclusion: voluntary organisations providing web-based breast cancer information have progress to make to ensure information provided is complete and transparent, and websites are user-friendly. Unfortunately, informed decision-making will not be optimised if patients cannot access quality information.
Practice implications: voluntary organisations should regularly review the quality of information on their websites. Grading of websites allows healthcare professionals to identify and signpost patients to trustworthy, up-to-date websites. Thus, ensuring patients receive high quality information

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: July 2009
Keywords: breast cancer, internet, quality, evaluation
Organisations: Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69383
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69383
ISSN: 0738-3991
PURE UUID: dadc2898-d653-450b-88a3-3fc7c1b51506
ORCID for Alison Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3127-5755

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Nov 2009
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:42

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