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IQ in early adulthood, socioeconomic position, and unintentional injury mortality by middle age: a cohort study of more than 1 million Swedish men

IQ in early adulthood, socioeconomic position, and unintentional injury mortality by middle age: a cohort study of more than 1 million Swedish men
IQ in early adulthood, socioeconomic position, and unintentional injury mortality by middle age: a cohort study of more than 1 million Swedish men
The authors evaluated the little-examined association between intelligence (IQ) and injury mortality and, for the first known time, explored the extent to which IQ might explain established socioeconomic inequalities in injury mortality. A nationwide cohort of 1,116,442 Swedish men who underwent IQ testing at about 18 years of age was followed for mortality experience for an average of 22.6 years. In age-adjusted analyses in which IQ scores were classified into 4 groups, relative to the highest scoring category, the hazard ratio in the lowest was elevated for all injury types: poisonings (hazard ratio (HR) = 5.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.25, 7.97), fire (HR = 4.39, 95% CI: 2.51, 7.77), falls (HR = 3.17, 95% CI: 2.19, 4.59), drowning (HR = 3.16, 95% CI: 1.85, 5.39), and road injury (HR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.91, 2.47). Dose-response effects across the full IQ range were evident (P-trend < 0.001). Control for potential covariates, including socioeconomic position, had little impact on these gradients. When socioeconomic disadvantage -- indexed by parental and subject's own occupational social class -- was the exposure of interest, IQ explained a sizable portion (19%-86%) of the relation with injury mortality. These findings suggest that IQ may have an important role both in the etiology of injuries and in explaining socioeconomic inequalities in injury mortality.
0002-9262
606-615
Batty, G.David
b592fe37-9757-4ea7-820b-b3d7896f9cf2
Gale, Catherine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Tynelius, Per
ac8bf45c-361b-4ae5-b4a1-234610c39cbd
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac
Rasmussen, Finn
3ae452ae-94b8-4bd3-b54f-dd96518a8404
Batty, G.David
b592fe37-9757-4ea7-820b-b3d7896f9cf2
Gale, Catherine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Tynelius, Per
ac8bf45c-361b-4ae5-b4a1-234610c39cbd
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac
Rasmussen, Finn
3ae452ae-94b8-4bd3-b54f-dd96518a8404

Batty, G.David, Gale, Catherine R., Tynelius, Per, Deary, Ian J. and Rasmussen, Finn (2009) IQ in early adulthood, socioeconomic position, and unintentional injury mortality by middle age: a cohort study of more than 1 million Swedish men. American Journal of Epidemiology, 169 (5), 606-615. (doi:10.1093/aje/kwn381).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The authors evaluated the little-examined association between intelligence (IQ) and injury mortality and, for the first known time, explored the extent to which IQ might explain established socioeconomic inequalities in injury mortality. A nationwide cohort of 1,116,442 Swedish men who underwent IQ testing at about 18 years of age was followed for mortality experience for an average of 22.6 years. In age-adjusted analyses in which IQ scores were classified into 4 groups, relative to the highest scoring category, the hazard ratio in the lowest was elevated for all injury types: poisonings (hazard ratio (HR) = 5.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.25, 7.97), fire (HR = 4.39, 95% CI: 2.51, 7.77), falls (HR = 3.17, 95% CI: 2.19, 4.59), drowning (HR = 3.16, 95% CI: 1.85, 5.39), and road injury (HR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.91, 2.47). Dose-response effects across the full IQ range were evident (P-trend < 0.001). Control for potential covariates, including socioeconomic position, had little impact on these gradients. When socioeconomic disadvantage -- indexed by parental and subject's own occupational social class -- was the exposure of interest, IQ explained a sizable portion (19%-86%) of the relation with injury mortality. These findings suggest that IQ may have an important role both in the etiology of injuries and in explaining socioeconomic inequalities in injury mortality.

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Published date: 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 69957
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/69957
ISSN: 0002-9262
PURE UUID: eccc7dc1-a18f-4f5b-8ac2-d6bcd685fb44
ORCID for Catherine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638

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Date deposited: 05 Jan 2010
Last modified: 06 Feb 2019 01:37

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