The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A review of the association between antipsychotic use and hyperprolactinaemia

A review of the association between antipsychotic use and hyperprolactinaemia
A review of the association between antipsychotic use and hyperprolactinaemia
Recent evidence linking hyperprolactinaemia to longer-term clinical sequelae, including osteoporosis, hip fractures and possibly breast cancer, is increasing clinical awareness of the relevance of hyperprolactinaemia. A review of the literature finds clinical trials reporting some degree of comparative prolactin data among antipsychotics. Many of the randomised clinical trials (RCTs) do not report categorical rates of hyperprolactinaemia in contrast with the naturalistic studies, making it complex for clinicians to evaluate the extent and severity of hyperprolactinaemia.Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the commonest adverse events reported in clinical trials and can be found in association with all antipsychotics. The highest rates of hyperprolactinaemia are reported in association with risperidone and amisulpride, often as high as 80-90% of all female subjects and consistently greater than with the typical antipsychotics. Significant rates of hyperprolactinaemia of lesser severity and more transience have also been reported in association with other atypical antipsychotics.
hyperprolactinemia, male, *adverse effects, complications, clinical trials as topic, *drug therapy, research design, risk assessment, antipsychotic agents, mental disorders, risk factors, cross-sectional studies, female, evidence-based medicine, humans, *chemically induced
0269-8811
46-55
Bushe, Chris
cb7915e9-b24f-40f4-8d7c-02bb73274e93
Shaw, Michael
df193f67-691b-4221-9744-b8488c43e2e8
Peveler, Robert C.
93198224-78d9-4c1f-9c07-fdecfa69cf96
Bushe, Chris
cb7915e9-b24f-40f4-8d7c-02bb73274e93
Shaw, Michael
df193f67-691b-4221-9744-b8488c43e2e8
Peveler, Robert C.
93198224-78d9-4c1f-9c07-fdecfa69cf96

Bushe, Chris, Shaw, Michael and Peveler, Robert C. (2008) A review of the association between antipsychotic use and hyperprolactinaemia. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 22 (Supplement 2), 46-55. (doi:10.1177/0269881107088435).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent evidence linking hyperprolactinaemia to longer-term clinical sequelae, including osteoporosis, hip fractures and possibly breast cancer, is increasing clinical awareness of the relevance of hyperprolactinaemia. A review of the literature finds clinical trials reporting some degree of comparative prolactin data among antipsychotics. Many of the randomised clinical trials (RCTs) do not report categorical rates of hyperprolactinaemia in contrast with the naturalistic studies, making it complex for clinicians to evaluate the extent and severity of hyperprolactinaemia.Hyperprolactinaemia is one of the commonest adverse events reported in clinical trials and can be found in association with all antipsychotics. The highest rates of hyperprolactinaemia are reported in association with risperidone and amisulpride, often as high as 80-90% of all female subjects and consistently greater than with the typical antipsychotics. Significant rates of hyperprolactinaemia of lesser severity and more transience have also been reported in association with other atypical antipsychotics.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2008
Keywords: hyperprolactinemia, male, *adverse effects, complications, clinical trials as topic, *drug therapy, research design, risk assessment, antipsychotic agents, mental disorders, risk factors, cross-sectional studies, female, evidence-based medicine, humans, *chemically induced

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 70102
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/70102
ISSN: 0269-8811
PURE UUID: 55a747cb-7eb1-42e4-8081-382d466b90a0
ORCID for Robert C. Peveler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5596-9394

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2010
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:13

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×