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Sleep problems in a Down Syndrome population

Sleep problems in a Down Syndrome population
Sleep problems in a Down Syndrome population
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sleep problems in children with Down syndrome. Design and SETTING: A community prevalence study in a child population of 100,000 in England. PARTICIPANTS: 58 children with Down syndrome aged to 0.65-17.9 yrs (mean 8.6 years). INTERVENTIONS: Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire. RESULTS: Compared to published data for typically developing populations, children were reported to have significantly greater bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, night waking, parasomnias, sleep disordered breathing and day-time sleepiness. Amongst children 4 years and older 66% rarely fell asleep in their own beds; 55% were always restless during sleep and 40% usually woke at least once in the night. Importantly, 78% seemed tired during the day at least 2 days per week, suggesting inadequate sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Parents report universal sleep problems in school aged children with Down syndrome. Paediatricians should routinely enquire about sleep behaviour in these children
anxiety, england, child, aged, syndrome, prevalence, sleep problems in down syndrome children
0003-9888
308-310
Carter, M.
99ed122b-ea4c-4fc4-a83a-8a4a1c3aa729
McCaughey, E.
14d69947-ba87-4a5d-af33-b04da51f9268
Annaz, D.
ae3807b4-ea91-496b-918e-de0c854e9698
Hill, C.M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Carter, M.
99ed122b-ea4c-4fc4-a83a-8a4a1c3aa729
McCaughey, E.
14d69947-ba87-4a5d-af33-b04da51f9268
Annaz, D.
ae3807b4-ea91-496b-918e-de0c854e9698
Hill, C.M.
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d

Carter, M., McCaughey, E., Annaz, D. and Hill, C.M. (2008) Sleep problems in a Down Syndrome population. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 94 (4), 308-310. (doi:10.1136/adc.2008.146845).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sleep problems in children with Down syndrome. Design and SETTING: A community prevalence study in a child population of 100,000 in England. PARTICIPANTS: 58 children with Down syndrome aged to 0.65-17.9 yrs (mean 8.6 years). INTERVENTIONS: Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire. RESULTS: Compared to published data for typically developing populations, children were reported to have significantly greater bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, night waking, parasomnias, sleep disordered breathing and day-time sleepiness. Amongst children 4 years and older 66% rarely fell asleep in their own beds; 55% were always restless during sleep and 40% usually woke at least once in the night. Importantly, 78% seemed tired during the day at least 2 days per week, suggesting inadequate sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Parents report universal sleep problems in school aged children with Down syndrome. Paediatricians should routinely enquire about sleep behaviour in these children

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More information

Published date: April 2008
Keywords: anxiety, england, child, aged, syndrome, prevalence, sleep problems in down syndrome children

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 70107
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/70107
ISSN: 0003-9888
PURE UUID: dd360635-d89b-4316-bb44-ca661dacab7d

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Date deposited: 21 Jan 2010
Last modified: 19 Jul 2017 00:04

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Contributors

Author: M. Carter
Author: E. McCaughey
Author: D. Annaz
Author: C.M. Hill

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