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Women of lower educational attainment have lower food involvement and eat less fruit and vegetables

Women of lower educational attainment have lower food involvement and eat less fruit and vegetables
Women of lower educational attainment have lower food involvement and eat less fruit and vegetables
Women who leave school with few OF no educational qualifications are less likely to have diets that meet current recommendations than women who attain more qualifications at school. We hypothesise that lower 'food involvement', meaning that food has a lower level of importance in their lives, explains the poorer quality diets of women of lower educational attainment. We administered Bell and Marshall [(2003). The construct of food involvement in behavioral research: Scale development and validation. Appetite, 40, 235-244.] Food Involvement scale to 242 women of varied educational attainment, of whom 127 were also asked how often they ate fruit and vegetables. Women's food involvement decreased with decreasing educational attainment. Forty-two percent of women who had no educational qualifications were in the lowest quarter of the food involvement score, compared with 12% of women with degrees. Women with lower scores on the food involvement scale also reported eating fruit and vegetables less often. The odds of eating fewer fruit and vegetables rose with lower educational attainment and with lower food involvement scores, suggesting that each has an independent effect. We have shown that the Food Involvement scale discriminates between women, is associated with other characteristics and predicts dietary quality. We now plan to use it in a larger, representative population of women of lower educational attainment to examine its role along with other psychological variables in determining dietary quality.
habits, development, food involvement, dietary, dietary quality, behavior, england, education, diet, women, fruit and vegetables, eating
0195-6663
464-468
Barker, M.
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2
Lawrence, W.
e9babc0a-02c9-41df-a289-7b18f17bf7d8
Woadden, J.
54381069-1cb5-4611-9608-b7ae29b86078
Crozier, S. R.
2c40507d-a1db-4577-b63e-ae62cdc681a4
Skinner, T. C.
022037f6-b670-41fb-96eb-fbd184290d06
Barker, M.
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2
Lawrence, W.
e9babc0a-02c9-41df-a289-7b18f17bf7d8
Woadden, J.
54381069-1cb5-4611-9608-b7ae29b86078
Crozier, S. R.
2c40507d-a1db-4577-b63e-ae62cdc681a4
Skinner, T. C.
022037f6-b670-41fb-96eb-fbd184290d06

Barker, M., Lawrence, W., Woadden, J., Crozier, S. R. and Skinner, T. C. (2008) Women of lower educational attainment have lower food involvement and eat less fruit and vegetables. Appetite, 50 (2-3), 464-468. (doi:10.1016/j.appet.2007.10.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Women who leave school with few OF no educational qualifications are less likely to have diets that meet current recommendations than women who attain more qualifications at school. We hypothesise that lower 'food involvement', meaning that food has a lower level of importance in their lives, explains the poorer quality diets of women of lower educational attainment. We administered Bell and Marshall [(2003). The construct of food involvement in behavioral research: Scale development and validation. Appetite, 40, 235-244.] Food Involvement scale to 242 women of varied educational attainment, of whom 127 were also asked how often they ate fruit and vegetables. Women's food involvement decreased with decreasing educational attainment. Forty-two percent of women who had no educational qualifications were in the lowest quarter of the food involvement score, compared with 12% of women with degrees. Women with lower scores on the food involvement scale also reported eating fruit and vegetables less often. The odds of eating fewer fruit and vegetables rose with lower educational attainment and with lower food involvement scores, suggesting that each has an independent effect. We have shown that the Food Involvement scale discriminates between women, is associated with other characteristics and predicts dietary quality. We now plan to use it in a larger, representative population of women of lower educational attainment to examine its role along with other psychological variables in determining dietary quality.

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More information

Published date: March 2008
Keywords: habits, development, food involvement, dietary, dietary quality, behavior, england, education, diet, women, fruit and vegetables, eating

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 70280
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/70280
ISSN: 0195-6663
PURE UUID: bacbeb8c-7ea5-401d-8eb1-2b217edd141d
ORCID for M. Barker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2976-0217

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jan 2010
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:04

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